UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

WASHINGTON, D.C. 20549

 

FORM 10-K

 

x ANNUAL REPORT UNDER SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the fiscal year ended September 29, 2013

 

¨ TRANSITION REPORT UNDER SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the transition period from ___ until ___

 

Commission File Number 000-22573

 

OPTEX SYSTEMS HOLDINGS, INC.

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 

Delaware 33-143215
(State or other jurisdiction of (I.R.S. Employer
incorporation organization) Identification No.)
   
1420 Presidential Drive  
Richardson, TX 75081-2439
(Address of principal executive offices) (Zip Code)
   
Registrant’s telephone number, including area code (972) 764-5700

 

Securities Registered under Section 12(b) of the Act

None

 

Securities Registered under Section 12(g) of the Act

Common Stock, par value $.001 per share

 

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act. Yes ¨  No x

 

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act. Yes ¨  No x

 

Indicate by check mark whether the issuer (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the past 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. Yes x No ¨

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§ 232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files). Yes x No ¨

  

Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K. ¨

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

 

Large accelerated filer ¨ Accelerated filer ¨
Non-accelerated filer ¨ Smaller reporting company x

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act). Yes ¨ No x

 

The aggregate market value of the 157,346,607 shares of voting stock held by non-affiliates of the registrant based on the closing price on the OTC Markets on March 31, 2013 was $1,573,466.

 

Indicate the number of shares outstanding of each of the registrant’s classes of common stock, as of the latest practicable date.

 

    Shares Outstanding
Title of Class   December 19, 2013
Common Stock   157,346,607

 

DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE

 

None.

 

 
Table of Contents

  

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

PART I    
     
Item 1. Description of Business. 1
     
Item 1A. Risk Factors. 13
     
Item 2. Properties. 21
     
Item 3. Legal Proceedings. 22
     
Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosures. 22
     
PART II    
     
Item 5. Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Securities. 23
     
Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Conditions and Results of Operations. 24
     
Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data. 33
     
Item 9. Changes in and Disagreements With Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure. 56
     
Item 9A. Controls and Procedures. 56
     
PART III    
     
Item 10. Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance. 57
     
Item 11. Executive Compensation. 61
     
Item 12. Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters. 66
     
Item 13. Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence. 67
     
Item 14. Principal Accounting Fees and Services. 70
     
PART IV    
     
Item 15 Exhibits 71

 

 
Table of Contents

 

Cautionary Note Regarding Forward-Looking Information

 

This Report on Form 10-K, in particular Part II Item 7 “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations,” contains certain “forward-looking statements” within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended (the “Securities Act”), and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the “Exchange Act”). These forward-looking statements represent our expectations, beliefs, intentions or strategies concerning future events, including, but not limited to, any statements regarding our assumptions about financial performance; the continuation of historical trends; the sufficiency of our cash balances for future liquidity and capital resource needs; the expected impact of changes in accounting policies on our results of operations, financial condition or cash flows; anticipated problems and our plans for future operations; and the economy in general or the future of the defense industry, all of which were subject to various risks and uncertainties.

 

When used in this Report on Form 10- K and other reports, statements, and information we have filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission (“Commission” or “SEC”), in our press releases, presentations to securities analysts or investors, in oral statements made by or with the approval of an executive officer, the words or phrases “believes,” “may,” “will,” “expects,” “should,” “continue,” “anticipates,” “intends,” “will likely result,” “estimates,” “projects” or similar expressions and variations thereof are intended to identify such forward-looking statements. However, any statements contained in this Report on Form 10-K that are not statements of historical fact may be deemed to be forward-looking statements. We caution that these statements by their nature involve risks and uncertainties, certain of which are beyond our control, and actual results may differ materially depending on a variety of important factors.

 

We do not assume the obligation to update any forward-looking statement. You should carefully evaluate such statements in light of factors described in this prospectus. In this Form 10-K, Optex Systems Holdings, Inc. (“Optex Systems Holdings”) has identified important factors that could cause actual results to differ from expected or historic results. You should understand that it is not possible to predict or identify all such factors. Consequently, you should not consider any such list to be a complete list of all potential risks or uncertainties.

 

 
Table of Contents

 

PART I

 

Item 1  Description of Business

 

Background

 

Prior History - Sustut Exploration, Inc.

 

Sustut was a Delaware corporation formed on April 11, 2006 to search for available mining properties in North Central British Columbia. It entered into an option agreement in 2006 to purchase a mineral claim, and the option expired in May 2008 without any payment being made. Thus, as of May 2008, Sustut was left with no operating business of which to dispose.

 

As a result of the reorganization on March 30, 2009, Optex Systems Holdings changed its name from Sustut Exploration Inc. to Optex Systems Holdings, Inc., and its year end from December 31 to a fiscal year ending on the Sunday nearest September 30.

 

Reorganization

 

On March 30, 2009, a reorganization occurred whereby the then existing shareholders of Optex Systems, Inc., a private Delaware corporation (“Optex Systems, Inc. (Delaware)”), exchanged their shares of Optex Systems, Inc. (Delaware) common stock with the shares of common stock of Optex Systems Holdings as follows: (i) the outstanding 85,000,000 shares of Optex Systems, Inc. (Delaware) common stock were exchanged for 113,333,282 shares of Optex Systems Holdings common stock, (ii) the outstanding 1,027 shares of Optex Systems, Inc. (Delaware) Series A preferred stock were exchanged for 1,027 shares of Optex Systems Holdings Series A preferred stock and (iii) the 8,131,667 shares of Optex Systems, Inc. (Delaware) common stock purchased in the private placement were exchanged for 8,131,667 shares of Optex Systems Holdings common stock. Optex Systems, Inc. (Delaware) has remained a wholly-owned subsidiary of Optex Systems Holdings, and the Optex Systems, Inc. (Delaware) shareholders are now shareholders of Optex Systems Holdings. As a result of the reorganization, Sileas Corporation, a former shareholder of Optex Systems, Inc. (Delaware), beneficially owns approximately 84.95% of the issued and outstanding common stock of Optex Systems Holdings and Alpha Capital Anstalt, a former shareholder of Optex Systems, Inc. (Delaware) owns 8.56% of the issued and outstanding common stock of Optex Systems Holdings. Furthermore, at the time of the reorganization, Andrey Oks resigned as the sole officer and director of Optex Systems Holdings.

 

Optex Systems, Inc. (Delaware) manufactures optical sighting systems and assemblies, primarily for Department of Defense applications. Its products are installed on various types of U.S. military land vehicles, such as the Abrams and Bradley fighting vehicles, light armored and armored security vehicles and have been selected for installation on the Stryker family of vehicles. Optex Systems, Inc. (Delaware) also manufactures and delivers numerous periscope configurations, rifle and surveillance sights and night vision optical assemblies. Optex Systems, Inc. (Delaware) products consist primarily of build-to-customer print products that are delivered both directly to the armed services and to other defense prime contractors. Less than 1% of today’s revenue is related to the resale of products substantially manufactured by others. In this case, the product would likely be a simple replacement part of a larger system previously produced by Optex Systems, Inc. (Delaware).

 

 

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Products

 

Optex Systems Holdings’ products are installed on various types of U.S. military land vehicles, such as the Abrams and Bradley, and Stryker families of fighting vehicles, as well as light armored (LAV) and armored security (ASV) vehicles. Optex Systems Holdings also manufactures and delivers numerous periscope configurations, rifle and surveillance sights and night vision optical assemblies. Optex Systems Holdings delivers its products both directly to the federal government and to prime contractors.

 

Optex Systems Holdings delivers high volume products, under multi-year contracts, to large defense contractors and government customers. Increased emphasis in the past twelve months has been on new opportunities to promote and deliver Optex products in foreign military sales, where U.S.-manufactured, combat and wheeled vehicles, are supplied (and upgraded) in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Defense. We have a reputation for quality and credibility with our customers as a strategic supplier. We also anticipate the opportunity to integrate some of our night vision and optical sights products into commercial applications.

 

Specific product lines include:

 

Electronic sighting systems

 

Mechanical sighting systems

 

Laser protected glass periscopes

 

Laser protected plastic periscopes

 

Non-laser protected plastic periscopes

 

Howitzer sighting systems

 

M36 Thermal Day / Night Periscopes

 

M17 Day / Thermal Periscopes

 

Ship binoculars

 

Replacement optics (e.g. filters, mirrors)

 

Location and Facility

 

We are located in Richardson, TX in an approximately 49,000 square foot facility, and as of December 9, 2013, we had 63 full time equivalent employees. We operate with a single shift, and capacity could be expanded by adding a second shift. Our proprietary processes and methodologies provide barriers to entry for other competing suppliers. In many cases, we are the sole source provider or one of only two providers of a product. We have capabilities which include machining, bonding, painting, tracking, engraving and assembly and can perform both optical and environmental testing in-house.

 

We lease our facility. Effective as of December 10, 2013, and executed on December10, 2013, Optex Systems Holdings, Inc. renewed its Richardson, TX lease. Under the terms of the amendment:

 

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The lease term is extended until March 31, 2021.

 

The annual base rent rate is as follows: from 1/1/14 -3/31/14, $0.00 per square foot; from 4/1/2010 – 3/31/2018, $5.45 per square foot; from 4/1/2018 – 3/31/2019, $5.65 per square foot; from 4/1/2019 – 3/31/2020, $5.85 per square foot; and from 4/1/2020 – 3/31/2021, $6.05 per square foot.

 

A $0.35 million HVAC improvement allowance is included.

 

Contracts

 

Each contract with Optex Systems Holdings’ customers has specific quantities of material that need to be purchased, assembled, and then shipped. Prior to bidding a contract, Optex Systems Holdings contacts potential sources of material and receives qualified quotations for this material. In some cases, the entire volume is given to a single supplier and in other cases, the volume might be split between several suppliers. If a contract has a single source supplier and that supplier fails to meet their obligations (e.g., quality, delivery), then Optex Systems Holdings would attempt to find an acceptable alternate supplier, and if successful, it would then renegotiate contractual deliverables (e.g., specifications, delivery, price). As of December 9, 2013, approximately 29% of our material requirements are single-sourced across 9 suppliers representing approximately 12% of our active supplier base.  Single-sourced component requirements span across all of our major product lines. Of these single sourced components, we have material contracts (purchase orders) with firm pricing and delivery schedules in place with each of the suppliers to supply the parts necessary to satisfy our current contractual needs.

 

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We are subject to, and must comply with, various governmental regulations that impact, among other things, our revenue, operating costs, profit margins and the internal organization and operation of our business. The material regulations affecting our U.S. government business are summarized in the table below.

 

Regulation   Summary
     
Federal Acquisition Regulation   The principal set of rules in the Federal Acquisition Regulation System (“FAR”). This system consists of sets of regulations issued by agencies of the federal government of the United States to govern what is called the “acquisition process,” which is the process through which the government acquires goods and services. That process consists of three phases: (1) need recognition and acquisition planning, (2) contract formation, and (3) contract administration. The FAR System regulates the activities of government personnel in carrying out that process. It does not regulate the purchasing activities of private sector firms, except to the extent that those activities involve government solicitations and contracts by reference.
     
International Traffic in Arms Regulations   United States government regulations that control the export and import of defense-related articles and services on the United States Munitions List. These regulations implement the provisions of the Arms Export Control Act.
     
Truth in Negotiations Act   A public law enacted for the purpose of providing for full and fair disclosure by contractors in the conduct of negotiations with the government. The most significant provision included is the requirement that contractors submit certified cost and pricing data for negotiated procurements above a defined threshold of $700,000 as October 1, 2010.  It requires contractors to provide the government with an extremely broad range of cost or pricing information relevant to the expected costs of contract performance, and it requires contractors and subcontractors to submit cost or pricing data to the government and to certify that, to the best of their knowledge and belief, the data are current, accurate, and complete.

 

Optex Systems Holdings is responsible for full compliance with the Federal Acquisition Regulation. Upon award, the contract may identify certain regulations that Optex Systems Holdings needs to meet. For example, a contract may allow progress billing pursuant to specific Federal Acquisition Regulation clauses incorporated into the contract. Other contracts may call for specific first article acceptance and testing requirements. The Federal Acquisition Regulation will identify the specific regulations that Optex Systems Holdings must follow based on the type of contract awarded. The Federal Acquisition Regulation also contains guidelines and regulations for managing a contract after award, including conditions under which contracts may be terminated, in whole or in part, at the government’s convenience or for default. These regulations also subject us to financial audits and other reviews by the government of our costs, performance, accounting and general business practices relating to our government contracts, which may result in adjustment of our contract-related costs and fees and, among other things and impose accounting rules that define allowable and unallowable costs governing our right to reimbursement under certain contracts.

 

First Article Testing and Acceptance requirements consist of specific steps. For example, the first article testing associated with Howitzer-type product is comprehensive and time consuming. The dimensions and material specifications of each piece of the assembly must be verified, and each product has in excess of 100 piece parts. Once the individual piece parts are verified to be compliant to the specification, the assembly processes are documented and verified. A sample of the production (typically three units) is verified to meet final performance specifications. Once the units meet the final performance specification, they are then subjected to accelerated life testing, a series of tests which simulate the lifetime use of the product in the field. This consists of exposing the units to thermal extremes, humidity, mechanical shock, vibration, and other physical exposure tests. Once completed, the units undergo a final verification process to ensure that no damage has occurred as a result of the testing and that they continue to meet the performance specification. All of the information and data is recorded into a final first article inspection and test report and submitted to the customer along with the test units for final approval. First Article Acceptance and Testing is generally required on new contracts/product awards but may also be required on existing products or contracts where there has been a significant gap in production, or where the product has undergone significant manufacturing process, material, tooling, equipment or product configuration changes.

 

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Optex Systems Holdings, Inc. is also subject to laws, regulations and executive orders restricting the use and dissemination of information deemed classified for national security purposes and the exportation of certain products and technical data as covered by the International Traffic in Arms Regulation. In order to import or export items listed on the U.S. Munitions List, we are required to be registered with the Directorate of Defense Trade Controls office. The registration is valid for one year, and the registration fees are established based on the number of license applications submitted the previous year. Optex Systems Holdings currently has an approved and current registration on file with the Directorate of Defense Trade Controls office. Once the registration is approved, each import/export license must be filed separately. License approval requires the company to provide proof of need, such as a valid contract or purchase order requirement for the specific product or technical data requested on the license and requires a detailed listing of the items requested for export/import, the end-user, the end-user statement, the value of the items, consignees/freight forwarders and a copy of a valid contract or purchase order from the end-user. The approval process for the license can vary from several weeks to six months or more. The licenses Optex Systems Holdings currently uses are the DSP-5 (permanent export), DSP-6 (license revisions) and DSP-73 (temporary export).

  

The aforementioned licenses are valid for 48 months from date that each such license is issued as set forth on the table below (updated as of December 9, 2013).

 

DSP - 5 licenses Issue Date

Expiration Date

(48 months of issue)

50187735 3/19/2010 3/19/2014
50230854 3/30/2010 3/30/2014
50221743 4/1/2010 4/1/2014
50209709 2/23/2010 2/23/2014
50233257 6/10/2010 6/10/2014
50269333 1/7/2011 1/7/2015
50274142 1/5/2011 1/5/2015
50275888 2/28/2011 2/28/2015
50284334 3/1/2011 3/1/2015
50290287 4/13/2011 4/13/2015
50290963 5/2/2011 5/2/2015
50302078 5/27/2011 5/27/2015
50303894 6/1/2011 6/1/2015
5029802 6/6/2011 6/6/2015
50310470 7/7/2011 7/7/2015
50309527 7/12/2011 7/12/2015
50313126 7/14/2011 7/14/2015
50314547 8/11/2011 8/11/2015
50324632 9/8/2011 9/8/2015
50323843 9/23/2011 9/23/2015
50343236 12/7/2011 12/7/2015
50343846 12/5/2011 12/5/2015
50343382 12/21/2011 12/21/2015
50343483 12/28/2011 12/28/2015
50355614 2/1/2012 2/1/2016
50355650 1/31/2012 1/31/2016

  

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DSP - 5 licenses Issue Date

Expiration Date

(48 months of issue)

50346638 2/13/2012 2/13/2016
50362079 2/29/2012 2/29/2016
50362307 3/19/2012 3/19/2016
50362221 3/19/2012 3/19/2016
50360195 3/23/2012 3/23/2016
(TA-0018-12B) 50374118 4/18/2012 4/18/2016
50381011 5/24/2012 5/24/2016
50382421 5/31/2012 5/31/2016
50386018 7/12/2012 7/12/2016
50397890 8/8/2012 8/8/2016
50398181 8/10/2012 8/10/2016
50398178 8/10/2012 8/10/2016
50402338 8/29/2012 8/29/2016
50403055 9/6/2012 9/6/2016
50399603 9/18/2012 9/18/2016
50401835 9/12/2012 9/12/2016
50430589 1/25/2013 1/23/2017
50435218 3/7/2013 3/6/2017
50435219 3/7/2013 3/6/2017
50439431 3/7/2013 11/5/2013
50455029 6/10/2013 6/9/2017
50459204 6/28/2013 6/27/2017
50468553 7/29/2013 7/29/2017
50468550 8/30/2013 8/29/2017
50470855 9/9/2013 9/9/2017

 

DSP - 6 Licenses

Date Issued

Expiration Date

(48 months of issue)

60026731 12/1/2011 12/1/2015
60024989 8/30/2011 3/1/2015

 

DSP - 73 Licenses

Date Issued

Expiration Date

(48 months of issue)

730024737 2/16/2010 2/16/2014
730026913 6/15/2010 6/15/2014
730030429 2/22/2011 2/22/2015
730031574 6/15/2011 6/15/2015
730033471 9/16/2011 9/16/2015
730033903 9/23/2011 9/23/2015
730038566 6/26/2012 6/26/2016
730038918 8/13/2012 8/13/2016

 

Licenses are subject to termination if a licensee is found to be in violation of the Arms Export Control Act or the International Traffic in Arms Regulations requirements. If a licensee is found to be in violation, in addition to a termination of its licenses, it can be subject to fines and penalties by the government.

 

Optex Systems Holdings’ contracts may also be governed by the Truth in Negotiation Act requirements where certain of our contracts or proposals exceed the $700,000 threshold and/or are deemed as sole source, or non competitive awards, covered under this act. For these contracts, Optex Systems Holdings must provide a vast array of cost and pricing data in addition to certification that our pricing data and disclosure materials are current, accurate and complete upon conclusion of the negotiation. Due to the additional disclosure and certification requirements, if a post contract award audit were to uncover that the pricing data provided was in any way not current, accurate or complete as of the certification date, Optex Systems Holdings could be subjected to a defective pricing claim adjustment with accrued interest. Currently, Optex Systems Holdings does not have any pending defective pricing claim adjustments. Additionally, as a result of this requirement, contract price negotiations may span from two to six months and can result in undefinitized or not to exceed ceiling priced contracts subject to future downward negotiations and price adjustments. Currently, Optex Systems Holdings does not have any undefinitized contracts subject to further price negotiation.

 

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Our failure to comply with applicable regulations, rules and approvals or misconduct by any of our employees could result in the imposition of fines and penalties, the loss of security clearances, the loss of our U.S. government contracts or our suspension or debarment from contracting with the U.S. government generally, any of which could have a material adverse effect our business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows. We are currently in compliance with all applicable regulations and do not have any pending claims as a result of noncompliance.

 

The terms of our material contracts are as follows (updated as of December 9, 2013):

  

              Total   Progress
/Milestone
  Order   Remaining    
    Customer   Contract     Award   Billable   Period   Value   Delivery
Customer   PO/Contract   Type     Value (2)   (1)   Expiration   (3)   Period
                                   
General Dynamics Land Systems   40156697/W56HZV-06-G-0006   Firm Fixed Price and Fixed Quantity Purchase Order     $ 1,136,591   Yes   N/A   $ 286,368   Jan 2013 -
Mar 2014
                                   
GDLS - Canada (4)   Subcontract PO 35334144   Firm Fixed Price and Fixed Quantity Purchase Order     $ 8,370,168   Yes   N/A   $ 5,625,633   Mid 2012 -
Oct 2017
                                   
GDLS - Canada (6)   Subcontract PO 35419634   Firm Fixed Price and Fixed Quantity Purchase Order     $ 1,018,512   No   N/A   $ 1,018,512   Aug 2015 -
Dec 2015
                                   
DLA Land & Maritime Chain (5)   SPM7LA12D0005   1 Year - IDQ with 4 Option Years     $ 1,425,579   No   Option 1 8/15/14   $ 259,677  

Dec 2012 –

Jan 2014

 

(1) Payment terms on shipments are net 30 days.

(2) “Total Award Value” as included in the table represents the total value of all delivery orders against the prime contract that have already been awarded to Optex. The total award value represents already awarded delivery order contracts. Based on Optex’s historical experience with these contracts and other similar contracts, the amount awarded has directly correlated to the amount received.

(3) The “Remaining Value” depicts the open undelivered values remaining to be delivered against the contract awards as of September 29, 2013. Only these undelivered values of the contracts may be subject to the contract termination clause. It has been the experience of Optex Systems that these clauses are rarely invoked.

(4) Contract was awarded on October 24, 2011 but effective November 3, 2011 as the date on which approved for disclosure by contractor.  This contract provides for milestone billing, in part. Total award value includes all statement of work change orders through December 3, 2013.

(5) This is a 1 year Indefinite Quantity Contract consisting of one base year and four option years. Total contract length is not to exceed five years. The contract was awarded in August, 2012. In August 2013, a contract modification was issued to exercise the first option year, thereby extending the contract ordering period through August 15, 2014. Through September 29, 2013 there have been twelve separate delivery orders against the contract for a total sum value of $1,425,579.

(6) New contract award quantity added on December 3, 2013 as a follow on quantity to the original PO 35334144.

 

Organizational History

 

On October 14, 2008, in a transaction that was consummated via public auction, Optex Systems, Inc. (Delaware) purchased all of the assets of Optex Systems, Inc. (Texas) in exchange for $15 million of Irvine Sensors Corporation debt and the assumption of approximately $3.8 million of certain liabilities of Optex Systems, Inc. (Texas). Optex Systems, Inc. (Delaware) was formed by the Longview Fund, LP and Alpha Capital Antstalt, former secured creditors of Irvine Sensors Corporation, to consummate the transaction with Optex Systems Holdings, and subsequently, on February 20, 2009, Longview Fund conveyed its ownership interest in Optex Systems Holdings to Sileas Corporation, an entity owned by three of Optex Systems Holdings’ officers (one of whom is also one of Optex Systems Holdings’ three directors). On March 30, 2009, a reorganization occurred whereby Optex Systems, Inc. (Delaware) became a wholly-owned subsidiary of Optex Systems Holdings.

 

Market Opportunity – U.S. Military

 

Optex Systems Holdings believes the U.S. government’s commitment to military defense spending in the coming years will remain strong; however, in light of recent government uncertainties including sequestration and other mandatory cost-cutting measures, related to the congressional budget and current deficit spending, we cannot anticipate whether the historical trends in military spending will continue at the same pace as in prior years. The chart below was derived from public government spending sources and depicts total U.S. military spending from 2001 through 2012 and forecasted spending through 2018. It is difficult to directly tie this spending to any specific military vehicles; (with the extraordinary exception of the Mine Resistant Ambush Protected $22 billion program funded in FY2007-2008); however, Optex Systems Holdings serves the U.S. armed forces, active duty and reserves, plus various state national guards. The purpose of including this chart is to provide the reader with actual trend data showing military spending by the government from 2001 through 2012. The total military spending increased from $290.2 billion in 2001 to $650.9 billion in 2012 representing a total increase in military spending of 224.3% in the last 12 years. However, unlike the trend depicted in this chart through 2011, we have experienced reduced spending in 2012 and 2013, and given anticipated reductions in spending by the U.S. military in the coming years, Optex Systems Holdings continues to aggressively pursue international opportunities in addition to maintaining its current footprint with U.S. vehicle manufactures, with existing as well as new product lines. Despite the downturn in U.S. military spending, Foreign Military Sales (FMS) funding, for products built in the United States for selected foreign militaries, has held to peak funding levels. Thus, Optex Systems Holdings has increased efforts to promote its proven military products, as well as newly improved product solutions directly to foreign military representatives. We are now bidding on several substantial government contracts to expand sales and production beyond the current production and backlog. For example, Optex Systems Holdings is supporting General Dynamics Land Systems in their efforts related to the production of the Israeli Namer Armored Personnel Carrier (aka Merkava APC). In this opportunity, General Dynamics Land Systems is contracting for the production of 386 vehicles which contain a “Periscope Kit” which could be supplied by Optex Systems Holdings. This kit would contain seven periscopes and sixteen additional supporting part numbers. Optex Systems Holdings will continue to pursue international opportunities through direct sales (e.g., General Dynamics Land Systems – Canada) and through existing customers (e.g., General Dynamics Land Systems – Israeli Namer Project). We are also exploring possibilities to adapt some of our products for commercial use in those markets that demonstrate potential for solid revenue growth, both domestically and internationally.

 

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 Source: Government Printing Office, U.S. Budget Historical Tables, FY 2013, Table 3.2 Outlays by function and subfunction, 1962-2018

 

The following factors are important to the U.S. military:

 

Product reliability – failure can cost lives

 

Speed to delivery and adherence to schedule

 

System life cycle extension

 

Low cost/best value

 

Visual aids for successful execution of mission objectives

 

Mission critical products specifically related to soldier safety.

  

Optex Systems Holdings focuses on delivering products that satisfy these factors and believes it is well positioned to continue to service U.S. and foreign military needs.

 

Market Opportunity – Commercial

 

Optex Systems Holdings’ products are currently sold to military and related government markets. We believe there may be opportunities to commercialize various products we presently manufacture to address other markets. Our initial focus will be directed in three product areas.

 

Big Eye Binoculars – While the military application we produce is based on mature military designs, Optex Systems Holdings owns all castings, tooling and glass technology. These large fixed mount binoculars could be sold to cruise ships, personal yachts and cities/municipalities. The binoculars are also applicable to fixed, land based outposts for private commercial security as well as border patrols and regional law enforcement.

 

Night Vision Sight – Optex Systems Holdings has manufactured the optical system for the NL-61 Night Vision Sight for the Ministry of Defense of Israel. This technology could be implemented for commercial applications.

 

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Infrared Imaging Equipment – Optex Systems Holdings manufactures and assembles infrared imaging equipment and components for Raytheon’s Thermal Imaging M36 Mount product and has recently added a low-cost, uncooled, thin film, thermal imager through its partnership with selective suppliers. This combined equipment and technology has potential applications with the border patrol, police and governmental or commercial security agencies.

 

Customer Base

 

Optex Systems Holdings serves customers in three primary categories: as prime contractor (TACOM Life Cycle Command, DLA (Defense Logistics Agency) Warren, U.S. Army, Navy and Marine Corps), as subcontractor (General Dynamics, BAE, and NorcaTec) and also as a supplier to foreign governments (Israel, Australia and NAMSA). Although we do serve all three of these categories, for the twelve months ended September 29, 2013, we derived approximately 89% of our gross business revenue from three customers: 47% from General Dynamics Land Systems Divisions, 30% from the U.S. Government (primarily DLA), and 12% from BAE Systems (with which we have approximately 75 discrete contracts for items that are utilized in vehicles, product lines and spare parts). Given the size of General Dynamics Land System Division, DLA and BAE as well as the fact that there are multiple contracts with each entity, which are not interdependent, we are of the opinion that this provides us with a fairly well diversified revenue pool.

 

Marketing Plan 

 

 

 

Potential Entrants – Low Risk to Optex Systems Holdings. In order to enter this market, potential competitors must overcome several barriers to entry. The first hurdle is that an entrant would need to prove to the government agency in question the existence of a government approved accounting system for larger contracts. Second, the entrant would need to develop the processes required to produce the product. Third, the entrant would then need to produce the product and then submit successful test requirements (many of which require lengthy government consultation for completion). Finally, in many cases, the customer has an immediate need and therefore cannot wait for this qualification cycle and therefore must issue the contracts to existing suppliers.

 

Historically, Optex Systems Holdings competed with two other companies in different spaces. First, Optex Systems Holdings previously competed with Miller-Holzwarth in the plastic periscope business. In July 2012, Miller-Holzwarth, Inc. ceased operations apparently as a result of an inability to meet its financial obligations combined with a decline in defense market conditions. Second, Optex Systems Holdings currently competes with Seiler Instruments for fire control products. These contracts are higher value products, but lower quantities. Given the expense of development and qualification testing, the barrier to entry is high for new competitors. Currently, the business is in receivership and the ultimate business and contract disposition is yet to be determined. However, overall plastic periscope demand quantities have declined in the last twelve months, while competition on the lower level periscope products has significantly increased as Optex Systems Holdings and a few new foreign contractors have aggressively competed for market share amongst the existing customer base and quantities.

 

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Buyers – Medium Risk to Optex Systems Holdings. In most cases the buyers (usually government agencies or defense contractors) have two fairly strong suppliers. It is in their best interest to keep at least two, and therefore, in some cases, the contracts are split between suppliers. In the case of larger contracts, the customer can request an open book policy on costs and expects a reasonable margin to have been applied.

 

Substitutes – Low Risk to Optex Systems Holdings. Optex Systems Holdings has both new vehicle contracts and replacement part contracts for the exact same product. The U.S. government has declared that the Abrams/Bradley base vehicles will be the ground vehicle of choice through 2040. The Bradley vehicle has been in service for 28 years, the Abrams for 27 years. In February 2008, the U.S. Army signed a multiyear third party contract for the delivery of improved Abrams and Bradleys. The contract is for up to 435 tanks and 540 Bradley vehicles. These are the only production tanks currently in production by the government. This, in conjunction with the 30 year life span, supports their continued use through 2040. The Abrams is the principal battle tank of the United States Army and Marine Corps, and the armies of Egypt, Kuwait, Saudi Arabia, and since 2007, Australia. The new contract terms allow efficiencies within the supply chain and a very long return on investment on new vehicle proposals. There is a new Ground Combat Vehicle in development that will ultimately supplement or replace the Bradley vehicles. The U.S. Army is waiting to receive prototype vehicles from different bidders to begin testing. The U.S. Army intends to replace about 40 percent of the Bradleys in its heavy combat brigades with new Ground Combat Vehicles and has an initial acquisition goal of 1,874 vehicles with the production of the vehicle anticipated to start in 2018.

 

Suppliers – Low to Medium Risk to Optex Systems Holdings. The suppliers of standard processes (e.g., casting, machining and plating) need to be very competitive to gain and /or maintain contracts. Those suppliers of products that use top secret clearance processes are slightly better off; however, there continues to be multiple avenues of supply and therefore only moderate power.

 

The second model is a two by two matrix for products and customers.

 

 

 

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This product/customer matrix sets forth our four basic approaches:

 

1)Sell existing products to existing customers.

 

2)Sell existing products to new customers.

 

3)Develop new products to meet the needs of our existing customers.

 

4)Develop new products to meet the needs of new customers.

 

The product categories described in the above matrix are associated with the product lines set forth below:

 

Name   Product Line
M137, M187, M119 Aiming Device   Howitzer Sighting Systems
Aiming Circle   Howitzer Sighting Systems
Periscopes   Laser Protected Plastic Periscopes
Collimators   Electronic Sighting Systems
Day/Night Thermal Vision   M36 or M17 Thermal Sighting Systems and Viewers
Back Up Sights   Mechanical Sighting Systems
ICWS   Laser Protected Glass Periscopes

 

Operations Plan

 

Our operations plan can be broken down into three distinct areas: material management, manufacturing space planning and efficiencies associated with economies of scale.

 

Materials Management

 

The largest portion of our costs is materials. We have completed the following activities in order to demonstrate continuous improvement:

 

-Successful completion of annual surveillance audit for ISO9001:2008 certificate, with no major nonconformance issues

 

-Weekly cycle counts on inventory items

 

-Weekly material review board meeting on non-moving piece parts

 

-Kanban kitting on products with consistent ship weekly ship quantities

 

-Daily cross functional floor meetings focused on delivery, yields and labor savings

 

-Redesigned floor layout using tenant improvement funds

 

-Daily review of yields and product velocity

 

-Bill of material reviews prior to work order release

 

Future continuous improvement opportunities include installation and training of shop floor control module within the ERP system and organizational efficiencies of common procurement techniques among buyers.

 

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Manufacturing Space Planning

 

We currently lease approximately 49,000 square feet of manufacturing space (see “Location and Facility”). Our current facility is sufficient to meet our immediate production needs without excess capacity. As our processes are primarily labor driven, we are able to easily adapt to changes in customer demand by adjusting headcounts, overtime schedules and shifts in line with production needs. In the event additional floor space is required to accommodate new contracts, Optex has the option to lease adjacent floor space at the current negotiated lease cost per square foot. As part of our lease agreement renewed December 10, 2013, effective December 10, 2013, Optex Systems Holdings was able to negotiate additional HVAC leasehold improvements of $0.35 million paid by the landlord. These funds are primarily earmarked for replacement and improvements of old outdated HVAC systems throughout the facility.

  

Consistent with the space planning, we will drive economies of scale to reduce support costs on a percentage of sales basis. These cost reductions can then be either passed through directly to the bottom line or used for business investment.

 

Our manufacturing process is driven by the use of six sigma techniques and process standardization. Initial activities in this area have been the successful six sigma projects in several production areas which have led to improved output and customer approval on the aesthetics of the work environment. In addition, we use many tools including 5S programs, six sigma processes, and define, measure, analyze, improve, control (DMAIC) problem solving techniques to identify bottlenecks within the process flow, reduce cost and improve product yields. Successful results can then be replicated across the production floor and drive operational improvements.

 

Economies of Scale

 

Plant efficiencies at Optex Systems Holdings fluctuate as a function of program longevity, complexity and overall production volume. Our internal processes are primarily direct labor intensive and can be more easily adapted to meet fluctuations in customer demand; however, our material purchases, subcontracted operations and manufacturing support costs are extremely sensitive to changes in volume. As our volume increases, our support labor, material and scrap costs decline as a percentage of revenue as we are able to obtain better material pricing, and scrap, start up and support labor (fixed) costs and they are spread across a higher volume base. On the contrary, as production volumes decline, our labor and material costs per unit of production generally increase. Additional factors that contribute to economies of scale relate to the longevity of the program. Long running, less complex programs (e.g., periscopes) do not experience as significant of an impact on labor costs as production volumes change, as the associated workforce is generally less skilled and can be ramped quickly as headcounts shift. Our more complex Howitzer and thermal day/night programs are more significantly impacted by volume changes as they require a more highly-skilled workforce and ramp time is longer as the training is more complex. Optex Systems Holdings continually monitors customer demand over a rolling twelve month window and in order to anticipate any changes in necessary manpower and material which allows us to capitalize on any benefits associated with increased volume and minimize any negative impact associated with potential declines in product quantities.

 

Intellectual Property

 

We utilize several highly specialized and unique processes in the manufacture of our products. While we believe that these trade secrets have value, it is probable that our future success will depend primarily on the innovation, technical expertise, manufacturing and marketing abilities of our personnel. We cannot assure you that we will be able to maintain the confidentiality of our trade secrets or that our non-disclosure agreements will provide meaningful protection of our trade secrets, know-how or other proprietary information in the event of any unauthorized use, misappropriation or other disclosure. The confidentiality agreements that are designed to protect our trade secrets could be breached, and we might not have adequate remedies for the breach. Additionally, our trade secrets and proprietary know-how might otherwise become known or be independently discovered by others. We possess one patent; and have applied for two others in the US and in foreign countries. While we are optimistic that our applications will be approved, we cannot guarantee that these patent applications will ever transpire into an awarded patent.  The claims were based on technology which is believed to be unique; however, there are many companies and many patents already awarded in this space.  Further, the time frame for the US Patent and Trademark Office to review the patent application and engage in negotiations cannot be guaranteed.

 

Our competitors, many of which have substantially greater resources, may have applied for or obtained, or may in the future apply for and obtain, patents that will prevent, limit or interfere with our ability to make and sell some of our products. Although we believe that our products do not infringe on the patents or other proprietary rights of third parties, we cannot assure you that third parties will not assert infringement claims against us or that such claims will not be successful.

 

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In May 2012, Optex Systems purchased a perpetual, non-exclusive license, with a single up front license fee of $200 thousand to use Patent 7,880,792 “Optical and Infrared Periscope with Display Monitor” owned by Synergy International Optronics, LLC. We believe the purchase of the license agreement may allow us to extend and expand our market potential for theM113APC vehicle type which has the highest number of commonly used armored vehicles in the world. The current estimated active M113 APC worldwide inventory is over 80,000 units. This licensing of this patent allows Optex Systems to develop additional products for this vehicle type, including the M17 Day/Thermal and M17 Day/Night periscopes.  We continue to prototype these products and demonstrate them to potential customers. 

 

Competition

 

The markets for our products are competitive. We compete primarily on the basis of our ability to design and engineer products to meet performance specifications set by our customers. Our customers include military and government end users as well as prime contractors that purchase component parts or subassemblies, which they incorporate into their end products. Product pricing, quality, customer support, experience, reputation and financial stability are also important competitive factors.

 

There are a limited number of competitors in each of the markets for the various types of products that we design, manufacture and sell. At this time, we consider our primary competitors to be Seiler Instruments, Kent Periscopes and Synergy International Optronics, LLC.

 

Our competitors are often well entrenched, particularly in the defense markets. Some of these competitors have substantially greater resources than we do. While we believe that the quality of our technologies and product offerings provides us with a competitive advantage over certain manufacturers, some of our competitors have significantly more financial and other resources than we do to spend on the research and development of their technologies and for funding the construction and operation of commercial scale plants.

 

We expect our competitors to continue to improve the design and performance of their products. We cannot assure investors that our competitors will not develop enhancements to, or future generations of, competitive products that will offer superior price or performance features, or that new technology or processes will not emerge that render our products less competitive or obsolete. Increased competitive pressure could lead to lower prices for our products, thereby adversely affecting our business, financial condition and results of operations. Also, competitive pressures may force us to implement new technologies at a substantial cost, and we may not be able to successfully develop or expend the financial resources necessary to acquire new technology. We cannot assure you that we will be able to compete successfully in the future.

 

Employees

 

Optex Systems Holdings had 63 full time equivalent employees as of September 29, 2013. Optex Systems Holdings also uses a small temporary work force to handle peak loads. To the best of its knowledge, Optex Systems Holdings is compliant with local prevailing wage, contractor licensing and insurance regulations, and has good relations with its employees, who are not currently unionized.

 

Item 1A  Risk Factors

 

Investing in our common stock involves a high degree of risk. Prospective investors should carefully consider the risks described below, together with all of the other information included or referred to in this annual report, before purchasing shares of our common stock. There are numerous and varied risks, known and unknown, that may prevent us from achieving our goals. The risks described below are not the only risks we will face. If any of these risks actually occurs, our business, financial condition or results of operations may be materially adversely affected. In such case, the trading price of our common stock could decline and investors in our common stock could lose all or part of their investment. The risks and uncertainties described below are not exclusive and are intended to reflect the material risks that are specific to us, material risks related to our industry and material risks related to companies that undertake a public offering or seek to maintain a class of securities that is registered or traded on any exchange or over-the-counter market.

  

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Risks Related to our Business

 

We expect that we may need to raise additional capital in the future beyond any cash flow from our existing business; additional funds may not be available on terms that are acceptable to us, or at all.

 

We anticipate we may have to raise additional capital in the future to service our debt and to finance our future working capital needs. We cannot assure you that any additional capital will be available on a timely basis, on acceptable terms, or at all. Future equity or debt financings may be difficult to obtain. If we are not able to obtain additional capital as may be required, our business, financial condition and results of operations could be materially and adversely affected.

 

We anticipate that our capital requirements will depend on many factors, including:

 

our ability to fulfill backlog;

 

our ability to procure additional production contracts;

 

our ability to control costs;

 

the timing of payments and reimbursements from government and other contracts, including but not limited to changes in federal government military spending and the federal government procurement process;

 

increased sales and marketing expenses;

 

technological advancements and competitors’ response to our products;

 

capital improvements to new and existing facilities;

 

our relationships with customers and suppliers; and

 

general economic conditions including the effects of future economic slowdowns, acts of war or terrorism and the current international conflicts.

 

Even if available, financings may involve significant costs and expenses, such as legal and accounting fees, diversion of management’s time and efforts, and substantial transaction costs. If adequate funds are not available on acceptable terms, or at all, we may be unable to finance our operations, develop or enhance our products, expand our sales and marketing programs, take advantage of future opportunities or respond to competitive pressures.

 

Current economic conditions may adversely affect our ability to continue operations.

 

Current economic conditions may continue to cause a decline in business and consumer spending and capital market performance, which could adversely affect our business and financial performance. Our ability to raise funds, upon which we are fully dependent to continue to expand our operations, may be adversely affected by current and future economic conditions, such as a reduction in the availability of credit, financial market volatility and economic recession.

 

Our ability to fulfill our backlog may have an effect on our long term ability to procure contracts and fulfill current contracts.

 

Our ability to fulfill our backlog may be limited by our ability to devote sufficient financial and human capital resources and limited by available material supplies. If we do not fulfill our backlog in a timely manner, we may experience delays in product delivery which would postpone receipt of revenue from those delayed deliveries. Additionally, if we are consistently unable to fulfill our backlog, this may be a disincentive to customers to award large contracts to us in the future until they are comfortable that we can effectively manage our backlog.

 

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Our historical operations depend on government contracts and subcontracts. We face risks related to contracting with the federal government, including federal budget issues and fixed price contracts.

 

Future general political and economic conditions, which cannot be accurately predicted, may directly and indirectly affect the quantity and allocation of expenditures by federal agencies. Even the timing of incremental funding commitments to existing, but partially funded, contracts can be affected by these factors. Therefore, cutbacks or re-allocations in the federal budget could have a material adverse impact on our results of operations. Given the continued adverse economic conditions, the federal government has slowed its pace with regard to the release of orders for the U.S. military. Since we depend on orders for equipment for the U.S. military for a significant portion of our revenues, this slower release of orders will continue to have a material adverse impact on our results of operations. Obtaining government contracts may also involve long purchase and payment cycles, competitive bidding, qualification requirements, delays or changes in funding, budgetary constraints, political agendas, extensive specification development, price negotiations and milestone requirements. In addition, our government contracts are primarily fixed price contracts, which may prevent us from recovering costs incurred in excess of budgeted costs. Fixed price contracts require us to estimate the total project cost based on preliminary projections of the project’s requirements. The financial viability of any given project depends in large part on our ability to estimate such costs accurately and complete the project on a timely basis. Some of those contracts are for products that are new to our business and are thus subject to unanticipated impacts to manufacturing costs. Given the current economic conditions, it is also possible that even if our estimates are reasonable at the time made, that prices of materials are subject to unanticipated adverse fluctuation. In the event our actual costs exceed fixed contractual costs of our product contracts, we will not be able to recover the excess costs which could have a material adverse effect on our business and results of operations. We examine these contracts on a regular basis and accrue for anticipated losses on these contracts, if necessary. As of September 29, 2013, previous loss contracts have been completed, and there are no future losses anticipated on our current backlog, thus we had no loss provision accrued for these fixed price contracts.

 

Approximately 95% of our contracts contain contract termination clauses for convenience. In the event these clauses should be invoked by our customer, future revenues against these contracts could be affected, however these clauses allow for a full recovery of any incurred contract costs plus a reasonable fee up through and as a result of the contract termination. We are currently unaware of any pending terminations on our existing contracts. In some cases, contract awards may be issued that are subject to renegotiation at a date (up to 180 days) subsequent to the initial award date. Generally, these subsequent negotiations have had an immaterial impact (zero to 5%) on the contract price of the affected contracts. Currently, none of our awarded contracts are subject to renegotiation.

 

We have sought to mitigate the adverse impact on our results of operations from U.S. military orders by seeking to obtain foreign military orders. Last fiscal year, we won a significant bid in securing an $8.0 million five year contact with a foreign military contractor and in December 2013, we received a quantity add on for and additional $1.0 million to the original contract; however, we do not expect this contract win and our other efforts to completely mitigate the negative impact that the slower pace of U.S. military orders has had on our results from operations.

 

There is further uncertainty which arises from the sequestration in early 2013 which may continue to affect business opportunities at the federal government level.

 

Military spending has been negatively impacted by the Budget Control Act of 2011 (the “Budget Act”), which was passed in August 2011. The Budget Act calls for a $917.0 billion reduction in discretionary spending over the next decade, and $1.2 trillion in automatic spending cuts over a nine-year period that are split between defense and non-defense programs began beginning in January 2013. Such cuts have resulted in further reductions, delays or cancellations of these programs, which could have a further material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

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If we fail to scale our operations appropriately in response to growth and changes in demand, we may be unable to meet competitive challenges or exploit potential market opportunities, and our business could be materially and adversely affected.

 

Our past growth has placed, and any future growth in our historical business is expected to continue to place, a significant strain on our management personnel, infrastructure and resources. To implement our current business and product plans, we will need to continue to expand, train, manage and motivate our workforce, and expand our operational and financial systems, as well as our manufacturing and service capabilities. All of these endeavors will require substantial management effort and additional capital. If we are unable to effectively manage our expanding operations, we may be unable to scale our business quickly enough to meet competitive challenges or exploit potential market opportunities, and our current or future business could be materially and adversely affected.

 

We do not have employment agreements with our key personnel, other than our Chief Executive Officer. If we are not able to retain our key personnel or attract additional key personnel as required, we may not be able to implement our business plan and our results of operations could be materially and adversely affected.

 

We depend to a large extent on the abilities and continued participation of our executive officers and other key employees. The loss of any key employee could have a material adverse effect on our business. We currently have only one employment agreement, with our Chief Executive Officer which currently expires on December 1, 2014, and we do not presently maintain “key man” insurance on any key employees. We believe that as our activities increase and change in character, additional, experienced personnel will be required to implement our business plan. Competition for such personnel is intense, and we cannot assure you that they will be available when required, or that we will have the ability to attract and retain them. In addition, due to our small size, we do not presently have depth of staffing in our executive, operational and financial management areas in order to have an effective succession plan should the need arise. Thus, in the event of the loss of one or more of our management employees, our results of operations could be vulnerable to challenges associated with recruiting additional key personnel, if such recruiting efforts are not successful in a timely manner.

 

Certain of our products are dependent on specialized sources of supply that are potentially subject to disruption which could have a material, adverse impact on our business.

 

Optex Systems Holdings has selectively single-sourced some of our material components in order to mitigate excess procurement costs associated with significant tooling and startup costs. Furthermore, because of the nature of government contracts, we are often required to purchase selected items from U.S. government approved suppliers, which may further limit our ability to utilize multiple supply sources for these key components.

 

To the extent any of these single sourced or government approved suppliers should have disruptions in deliveries due to production, quality, or other issues, Optex Systems Holdings may also experience related production delays or unfavorable cost increases associated with retooling and qualifying alternate suppliers. The impact of delays resulting from disruptions in supply for these items could negatively impact our revenue, our customer reputation, and our results of operations. In addition, significant price increases from single-source suppliers could have a negative impact on our profitability to the extent that we are unable to recover these cost increases on our fixed price contracts.

 

Each contract has a specific quantity of material which needs to be purchased, assembled, and finally shipped. Prior to bidding a contract, Optex Systems Holdings contacts potential sources of material and receives qualified quotations for this material. In some cases, the entire volume is given to a single supplier and in other cases, the volume might be split between several suppliers. If a contract has a single source supplier and that supplier fails to meet their obligations (e.g., quality, delivery), then Optex Systems Holdings would find an alternate supplier and bring this information back to the final customer. Contractual deliverables would then be re-negotiated (e.g., specifications, delivery, price). As of December 9, 2013, approximately 29% of our material requirements are single-sourced across 9 suppliers representing approximately 12% of our active supplier orders.  Single-sourced component requirements span across all of our major product lines. The vast majority of these single-sourced components could be provided by another supplier with minimal interruption in schedule (supply delay of 3 months or less) or increased costs. We do not believe these single sourced materials to pose any significant risk to Optex Systems Holdings as other suppliers are capable of satisfying the purchase requirements in a reasonable time period with minimal increases in cost. Of these single sourced components, we have contracts (purchase orders) with firm pricing and delivery schedules in place with each of the suppliers to supply parts in satisfaction of our current contractual needs.

 

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We consider only those specialized single source suppliers where a disruption in the supply chain would result in a period of three months or longer for Optex Systems Holdings to identify and qualify a suitable replacement to present a material financial or schedule risk. In the table below, we identify only those specialized single source suppliers and the product lines supported by those materials utilized by us as of December 9, 2013.

  

Product
Line
  Supplier   Supply Item   Risk   Purchase Orders  
                   
M36 DDAN   Raytheon EO Innovations   Digital camera system   Alternative source would take in excess of six months to qualify   Current firm fixed price & quantity purchase orders are in place with the supplier to meet all contractual requirements. Supplier is on schedule.  
                   
Periscopes   PolyOne Designed Structures and Solutions LLC   Cast acrylic   Alternative source would take in excess of six months to qualify   Current firm fixed price & quantity purchase orders are in place with the supplier to meet all contractual requirements. Supplier is on schedule.  
                   
M17 Day/Thermal   Digital Systems Engineering   Digital display   Alternative source would take in excess of six months to qualify   Current firm fixed price & quantity purchase orders are in place with the supplier to meet all contractual requirements. Supplier is on schedule.  
                   

Straight Telescope   Seiler Instrument & Mfg. Co., Inc.   Housing assembly   Alternative source would take in excess of six months to qualify   Current firm fixed price & quantity purchase orders are in place with the supplier to meet all contractual requirements.  
                   
Periscopes   Cast Well, Inc.   Assorted aluminum castings used in plastic periscope assemblies   Alternative source would take in excess of six months to qualify   Current firm fixed price & quantity purchase orders are in place with the supplier to meet all contractual requirements. Supplier is on schedule.  

 

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Product
Line
  Supplier   Supply Item   Risk   Purchase Orders  
                   
Straight Telescope   Barron Industries   Investment castings   Alternative source would take in excess of six months to qualify   Current firm fixed price & quantity purchase orders are in place with the supplier to meet all contractual requirements. Supplier is on schedule.  
                   
Other   Fresnel Technologies Inc.   Infrared filter   Single source on drawing   Current firm fixed price & quantity purchase orders are in place with the supplier to meet all contractual requirements. Supplier is on schedule.  
                   
Other   FLIR Precision Optics (Brysen Optical)   Specialized reticle assembly   Alternative source would take in excess of six months to qualify   Current firm fixed price & quantity purchase orders are in place with the supplier to meet all contractual requirements.  

 

The defense technology supply industry is subject to technological change and if we are not able to keep up with our competitors and/or they develop advanced technology as response to our products, we may be at a competitive disadvantage.

 

The market for our products is generally characterized by technological developments, evolving industry standards, changes in customer requirements, frequent new product introductions and enhancements, short product life cycles and severe price competition. Our competitors could also develop new, more advanced technologies in reaction to our products. Currently accepted industry standards may change. Our success depends substantially on our ability, on a cost-effective and timely basis, to continue to enhance our existing products and to develop and introduce new products that take advantage of technological advances and adhere to evolving industry standards. An unexpected change in one or more of the technologies related to our products, in market demand for products based on a particular technology or of accepted industry standards could materially and adversely affect our business. We may or may not be able to develop new products in a timely and satisfactory manner to address new industry standards and technological changes, or to respond to new product announcements by others. In addition, new products may or may not achieve market acceptance.

 

Unexpected warranty and product liability claims could adversely affect our business and results of operations.

 

The possibility of future product failures could cause us to incur substantial expense to repair or replace defective products. Some of our customers require that we warrant the quality of our products to meet customer requirements and be free of defects for twelve to fifteen months subsequent to delivery. Approximately 80% of our current (as of September 29, 2013) contract deliveries are covered by these warranty clauses. We establish reserves for warranty claims based on our historical rate of less than one percent of returned shipments against these contracts. There can be no assurance that this reserve will be sufficient if we were to experience an unexpectedly high incidence of problems with our products. Significant increases in the incidence of such claims may adversely affect our sales and our reputation with consumers. Costs associated with warranty and product liability claims could materially affect our financial condition and results of operations.

 

We derive almost all of our revenue from three customers and the loss of any of these customers could have a material adverse effect on our revenues.

 

For the year ended September 29, 2013, we derived approximately 89% of our gross business revenue from three customers: 47% from General Dynamics Land Systems Divisions, 30% from the U.S. Government (primarily DLA/Warren), and 12% from BAE Systems.  Procuring new customers and contracts may partially mitigate this risk. In particular, a decision by either General Dynamics Land System Division or DLA/Warren to cease issuing contracts to us could have a significant material impact on our business and results of operations given that they represent 77% of our gross business revenue. There can be no assurance that we could replace these customers on a timely basis or at all.

 

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We have approximately 75 discrete contracts with General Dynamics Land System Division and the U.S. Government (primarily DLA/Warren), and other prime contractors. If they choose to terminate these contracts, Optex Systems Holdings is entitled to fully recover all contractual costs and reasonable profits incurred up to or as a result of the terminated contract.

 

We only possess one patent and rely primarily on trade secrets to protect our intellectual property.

 

We utilize several highly specialized and unique processes in the manufacture of our products, for which we rely solely on trade secrets to protect our innovations. We cannot assure you that we will be able to maintain the confidentiality of our trade secrets or that our non-disclosure agreements will provide meaningful protection of our trade secrets, know-how or other proprietary information in the event of any unauthorized use, misappropriation or other disclosure. The confidentiality agreements that are designed to protect our trade secrets could be breached, and we might not have adequate remedies for the breach.

 

It is also possible that our trade secrets will otherwise become known or independently developed by our competitors, many of which have substantially greater resources, and these competitors may have applied for or obtained, or may in the future apply for or obtain, patents that will prevent, limit or interfere with our ability to make and sell some of our products. Although based upon our general knowledge (and we have not conducted exhaustive patent searches), we believe that our products do not infringe on the patents or other proprietary rights of third parties; however, we cannot assure you that third parties will not assert infringement claims against us or that such claims will not be successful.

 

Optex has two outstanding patent applications in the United States and foreign countries. While we are optimistic that our applications will be approved, we cannot guarantee that these patent applications will ever result in actual patents being awarded.  The claims were based on technology which is believed to be unique; however, there are many companies and many patents already awarded in this space.  Further, the time frame for the US Patent and Trademark Office to review the patent application and engage in negotiations cannot be guaranteed.

 

In the future, we may look to acquire other businesses in our industry and the acquisitions will require us to use substantial resources, among other things.

 

At some time in the future, we may decide to pursue acquisitions of other businesses in our industry. In order to successfully acquire other businesses, we would be forced to spend significant resources in both acquisition and transactional costs, which could divert substantial resources in terms of both financial and personnel capital from our current operations. Additionally, we might assume liabilities of the acquired business, and the repayment of those liabilities could have a material adverse impact on our cash flow. Furthermore, when a new business is integrated into our ongoing business, it is possible that there would be a period of integration and adjustment required which could divert resources from ongoing business operations.

 

Conversion of our Series A preferred stock could cause substantial dilution to our existing common stock holders, and certain other rights of the preferred stock holders present other risks to our existing common stock holders.

 

As of December 19, 2013, we had 157,346,607 shares of our common stock issued and outstanding. The outstanding shares of Series A preferred stock are currently convertible into 697,056,989 shares of our common stock, which represents 80.3% of our outstanding common stock assuming a full conversion of the Series A preferred stock into shares of our common stock.  This would greatly dilute the holdings of our existing common stockholders. In addition, the preferred shareholders vote on a one-to-one basis with our common shareholders on an as converted basis.

 

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Furthermore, in the event of a liquidation, the holders of our Series A preferred stock would receive priority liquidation payments before payments to common shareholders equal to the amount of the stated value of the preferred stock before any distributions would be made to our common shareholders. The total stated value of our preferred stock is $6,970,570, so the preferred shareholders would be entitled to receive that amount before any distributions could be made to common shareholders. The liabilities on our balance sheet exceed the liquidation value of our assets; therefore, upon a liquidation, there would be no assets remaining for distribution to common shareholders.

 

The preferred shareholders also have the right, by majority vote of the shares of preferred stock, to generally approve any issuances by us of equity and/or indebtedness, which is not ordinary course of trade indebtedness. Therefore, the preferred shareholders can effectively prevent us from entering into a transaction which they feel is not in their best interests, even if the transaction might otherwise be in the best interests of Optex Systems Holdings and its common shareholders.

  

Risks Relating to the Reorganization

 

One of our directors, who is also one of our executive officers, beneficially owns a substantial percentage of Optex Systems Holdings’ outstanding common stock, which gives him control over certain major decisions on which Optex Systems Holdings’ stockholders may vote, which may discourage an acquisition of Optex Systems Holdings.

 

As a result of the reorganization, Sileas Corp., which is owned by Optex Systems Holdings’ three officers (two of which are also directors of Optex Systems Holdings), beneficially owns in the aggregate, 84.1% of Optex Systems Holdings’ outstanding common stock. One director who is also an executive officer, Stanley Hirschman, owns the majority equity interest in Sileas. The interests of Optex Systems Holdings’ management may differ from the interests of other stockholders. As Optex Systems Holdings’ executive management has the right and ability to control virtually all corporate actions requiring stockholder approval, irrespective of how Optex Systems Holdings’ other stockholders may vote, including the following actions:

 

confirming or defeating the election of directors;

 

amending or preventing amendment of Optex Systems Holdings’ certificate of incorporation or bylaws;

 

effecting or preventing a reorganization, sale of assets or other corporate transaction; and

 

controlling the outcome of any other matter submitted to the stockholders for vote.

 

Optex Systems Holdings’ management’s beneficial stock ownership may discourage a potential acquirer from seeking to acquire shares of Optex Systems Holdings’ common stock or otherwise attempting to obtain control of Optex Systems Holdings, which in turn could reduce the stock price or prevent Optex Systems Holdings’ stockholders from realizing a premium over Optex Systems Holdings’ stock price.

 

The Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, or FINRA, has adopted sales practice requirements which may also limit a shareholder’s ability to buy and sell our stock.

 

FINRA has adopted rules that require that in recommending an investment to a customer, a broker-dealer must have reasonable grounds for believing that the investment is suitable for that customer. Prior to recommending speculative low priced securities to their non-institutional customers, broker-dealers must make reasonable efforts to obtain information about the customer’s financial status, tax status, investment objectives and other information. Under interpretations of these rules, FINRA believes that there is a high probability that speculative low priced securities will not be suitable for at least some customers. FINRA requirements make it more difficult for broker-dealers to recommend that their customers buy our common stock, which may limit your ability to buy and sell our stock and have an adverse effect on the market for its shares.

 

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Risks Relating to our Common Stock

 

Optex Systems Holdings’ stock price may be volatile.

 

The market price of Optex Systems Holdings’ common stock is likely to be highly volatile and could fluctuate widely in price in response to various factors, many of which are beyond Optex Systems Holdings’ control, including the following:

 

additions or departures of key personnel;

 

limited “public float” following the reorganization, in the hands of a small number of persons whose sales or lack of sales could result in positive or negative pricing pressure on the market price for the common stock;

 

operating results that fall below expectations;

 

economic and other external factors, including but not limited to changes in federal government military spending and the federal government procurement process; and

 

period-to-period fluctuations in Optex Systems Holdings’ financial results.

 

In addition, the securities markets have from time to time experienced significant price and volume fluctuations that are unrelated to the operating performance of particular companies. These market fluctuations may also materially and adversely affect the market price of Optex Systems Holdings’ common stock.

 

There is currently no liquid trading market for Optex Systems Holdings’ common stock, and Optex Systems Holdings cannot ensure that one will ever develop or be sustained.

 

Our common stock is currently approved for quotation on the OTC Markets OTCQB trading under the symbol OPXS. However, there is limited trading activity and not currently a liquid trading market. There is no assurance as to when or whether a liquid trading market will develop, and if such a market does develop, there is no assurance that it will be maintained. Furthermore, for companies whose securities are quoted on the OTC markets, it is more difficult (1) to obtain accurate quotations, (2) to obtain coverage for significant news events because major wire services generally do not publish press releases about such companies, and (3) to raise needed capital. As a result, purchasers of Optex Systems Holdings’ common stock may have difficulty selling their shares in the public market, and the market price may be subject to significant volatility.

 

The elimination of monetary liability against Optex Systems Holdings’ directors, officers and employees under Delaware law and the existence of indemnification rights to Optex Systems Holdings’ directors, officers and employees may result in substantial expenditures by Optex Systems Holdings and may discourage lawsuits against Optex Systems Holdings’ directors, officers and employees.

 

Optex Systems Holdings provides indemnification to its directors and officers to the extent provided by Delaware law. The foregoing indemnification obligation could result in Optex Systems Holdings incurring substantial expenditures to cover the cost of settlement or damage awards against directors and officers, which Optex Systems Holdings may be unable to recoup. These provisions and resultant costs may also discourage Optex Systems Holdings from bringing a lawsuit against directors and officers for breaches of their fiduciary duties and may similarly discourage the filing of derivative litigation by Optex Systems Holdings’ stockholders against Optex Systems Holdings’ directors and officers even though such actions, if successful, might otherwise benefit Optex Systems Holdings and its stockholders.

 

Item 2  Properties

 

We are located in Richardson, TX in approximately 49,000 square foot facility, and as of December 9, 2013, we had 63 full time equivalent employees. We operate with a single shift, and capacity could be expanded by adding a second shift.  Our proprietary processes and methodologies provide barriers to entry by other competing suppliers. In many cases, we are the sole source provider or one of only two providers of a product.  We have capabilities which include machining, bonding, painting, tracking, engraving and assembly and can perform both optical and environmental testing in-house.

 

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We lease our facility. Effective as of December 10, 2013, and executed on December 10, 2013, Optex Systems Holdings, Inc. renewed its Richardson, TX lease. Under the terms of the amendment:

 

The lease term is extended until March 31, 2021.

 

The annual base rent rate is as follows: from 1/1/14 -3/31/14, $0.00 per square foot; from 4/1/2010 – 3/31/2018, $5.45 per square foot; from 4/1/2018 – 3/31/2019, $5.65 per square foot; from 4/1/2019 – 3/31/2020, $5.85 per square foot; and from 4/1/2020 – 3/31/2021, $6.05 per square foot.

 

A $0.35 million HVAC improvement allowance is included.

 

Item 3  Legal Proceedings

 

None.

 

Item 4  Mine Safety Disclosures

 

None.

 

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PART II

 

Item 5. Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities.

 

Market Information

 

Effective with the start of trading on May 1, 2009, our stock received a ticker symbol change from “SSTX” to “OPXS” from FINRA and commenced trading under the new symbol on the OTC Bulletin Board. Trading in our stock has historically been sporadic, trading volumes have been low, and the market price has been volatile.

 

The following table shows the range of high and low prices for our common stock as reported by the OTC Bulletin Board or OTC Markets for each quarter since the first fiscal quarter of 2012. All prices are adjusted for the 2.5:1 forward split of the Company’s common stock authorized on February 27, 2009. All prices are derived from market information as to OTCBB/OTCQB prices as reported through the AOL Finance look up system. The quotations reflect inter-dealer prices, without retail markup, markdown or commission and may not represent actual transactions.

 

Period  High   Low 
         
First Quarter 2012  $0.01   $0.0011 
           
Second Quarter 2012  $0.02   $0.0025 
           
Third Quarter 2012  $0.02   $0.005 
           
Fourth Quarter 2012  $0.04   $0.0065 
           
First Quarter 2013  $0.014   $0.005 
           
Second Quarter 2013  $0.06   $0.0061 
           
Third Quarter 2013  $0.018   $0.0075 
           
Fourth Quarter 2013  $0.02   $0.008 

  

On December 19, 2013, the sale price for our common stock as reported on the OTC Markets was $0.01 per share.

 

Securities outstanding and holders of record

 

On December 19, 2013, there were approximately 80 record holders of our common stock and 157,346,607 shares of our common stock issued and outstanding.

 

Dividend Policy

 

We have not paid and do not expect to pay dividends on our common stock. Any future decision to pay dividends on our common stock will be at the discretion of our board and will depend upon, among other factors, our results of operations, financial condition and capital requirements.

 

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Information respecting equity compensation plans

 

Summary Equity Compensation Plan Information

 

Optex Systems Holdings adopted its 2009 Stock Option Plan on March 26, 2009.  On December 9, 2011, the Board of Directors of Optex Systems Holdings, Inc.  authorized an amendment to its Stock Option Plan to increase the number of issuable shares from 6,000,000 to 50,000,000 and authorized the grant of 10,000,000 options to two board members and a total of 36,070,000 to Optex Systems Holdings employees including 20,000,000 options to executive officers. On December 19, 2013, the Board of Directors of Optex Systems Holdings, Inc. authorized an amendment to its Stock Option Plan to increase the number of issuable shares from 50,000,000 to 75,000,000 and authorized the grant of 20,000,000 options to three board members and a grant of 5,000,000 to an Optex Systems Holdings officer. The options granted in 2011 and 2013 were at exercise prices of $0.01per share with each grant to vest 25% per year over four years for each year with which the grantee is still employed by or serving as a director of Optex Systems Holdings, Inc. (with all unvested options automatically expiring on the date of termination of employment by or service as a director of Optex Systems Holdings, Inc.) and all unvested options immediately vesting upon a change of control due to a merger or acquisition of the Company. As of December 9, 2013, 340,000 of these options had forfeited due to terminations, and 25,365,000 had vested.

 

 Item 7  Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

 

The following discussion should be read in conjunction with the consolidated financial statements and the related notes that are set forth in our financial statements elsewhere in this annual report.

 

This management’s discussion and analysis reflects information known to management as of our fiscal year end, September 29, 2013, and the date of filing. This MD&A is intended to supplement and complement our audited financial statements and notes thereto for the year ended September 29, 2013, prepared in accordance with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP). You are encouraged to review our financial statements in conjunction with your review of this MD&A. The financial information in this MD&A has been prepared in accordance with GAAP, unless otherwise indicated. In addition, we use non-GAAP financial measures as supplemental indicators of our operating performance and financial position. We use these non-GAAP financial measures internally for comparing actual results from one period to another, as well as for planning purposes. We will also report non-GAAP financial results as supplemental information, as we believe their use provides more insight into our performance. When a non-GAAP measure is used in this MD&A, it is clearly identified as a non-GAAP measures and reconciled to the most closely corresponding GAAP measure.

 

The following discussion highlights the principal factors that have affected our financial condition and results of operations as well as our liquidity and capital resources for the periods described.  This discussion contains forward-looking statements. Please see “Special cautionary statement concerning forward-looking statements” and “Risk factors” for a discussion of the uncertainties, risks and assumptions associated with these forward-looking statements. The operating results for the periods presented were not significantly affected by inflation.

 

Background

 

On March 30, 2009, a reorganization was consummated pursuant to which the then existing shareholders of Optex Systems, Inc. (Delaware) exchanged their shares of common stock for shares of common stock of Optex Systems Holdings as follows:  (i) the outstanding 85,000,000 shares of Optex Systems, Inc. (Delaware) common stock were exchanged by Optex Systems Holdings for 113,333,282 shares of Optex Systems Holdings common stock, (ii) the outstanding 1,027 shares of Optex Systems, Inc. (Delaware) Series A preferred stock were exchanged by Optex Systems Holdings for 1,027 shares of Optex Systems Holdings Series A preferred stock, and (iii) the 8,131,667 shares of Optex Systems, Inc. (Delaware) common stock purchased in the private placement were exchanged by Optex Systems Holdings for 8,131,667 shares of Optex Systems Holdings common stock.  Optex Systems, Inc. (Delaware) has remained a wholly-owned subsidiary of Optex Systems Holdings.

 

As a result of the reorganization, Optex Systems Holdings changed its name from Sustut Exploration Inc. to Optex Systems Holdings, Inc., and its year end from December 31 to a fiscal year ending on the Sunday nearest September 30.

 

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Optex Systems, Inc. (Delaware) manufactures optical sighting systems and assemblies, primarily for Department of Defense applications. Its products are installed on various types of U.S. military land vehicles, such as the Abrams and Bradley fighting vehicles, light armored and armored security vehicles and have been selected for installation on the Stryker family of vehicles. Optex Systems, Inc. (Delaware) also manufactures and delivers numerous periscope configurations, rifle and surveillance sights and night vision optical assemblies.  Optex Systems, Inc. (Delaware) products consist primarily of build-to-customer print products that are delivered both directly to the armed services and to other defense prime contractors.  Less than 1% of today’s revenue is related to the resale of products substantially manufactured by others.  In this case, the product would likely be a simple replacement part of a larger system previously produced by Optex Systems, Inc. (Delaware).

 

Many of our contracts allow for government contract financing in the form of contract progress payments pursuant to Federal Acquisition Regulation 52.232-16, “Progress Payments”.  As a small business, and subject to certain limitations, this clause provides for government payment of up to 90% of incurred program costs prior to product delivery.  To the extent our contracts allow for progress payments, we intend to utilize this benefit, thereby minimizing the working capital impact on Optex Systems Holdings for materials and labor required to complete the contracts.

 

Our contracts allow for Federal Acquisition Regulation 52.243-1 which entitles the contractor to an “equitable adjustment” to the contract if the contract changes result in a change in contract costs or time of performance.  In essence, an equitable price adjustment request is a request for a contract price modification (generally an increase) that allows for the contractor to be “made whole” for additional costs incurred which were necessitated by some modification of the contract effort.  This modification may come from an overt change in U.S. Government requirements or scope, or it may come from a change in the conditions surrounding the contract (e.g., differing site conditions or late delivery of U.S. Government-furnished property) which result in statement of work additions, deletions, part substitutions, schedule or other changes to the contract which impact the contractor’s overall cost to complete. Optex has submitted an equitable adjustment request on the Aiming Circle Howitzer program due to significant design issues impacting the manufacturability of the product. The requested equitable adjustment claim was formally rejected by the contracting agency on May 31, 2012; however, Optex Systems Holdings has appealed the decision with the Armed Services Board of Contract Appeals. While we remain optimistic that Optex has a justifiable claim, we cannot predict whether the appeal will be successful. In the event we are unsuccessful in obtaining an equitable adjustment settlement, there will be no future margin impact for on these programs as the losses have been previously recognized through the completion of the program.

 

Optex Systems Holdings also anticipates the opportunity to integrate some of its night vision and optical sights products into commercial applications. 

  

Results of Operations

 

Backlog as of September 29, 2013 was $12.3 million as compared to a backlog of $19.0 million as of September 30, 2012, representing decrease of 35.2%.  The following table depicts the current expected delivery by quarter of all contracts awarded as of September 29, 2013.

 

Product Line   Qtr 1     Qtr 2    Qtr 3    Qtr 4    2014    2015    2016    2017    Total 
Periscopes  $     2.3   $     1.4   $     0.5   $     0.2   $     4.4   $     0.1   $     0.0   $     0.1   $     4.6 
Sighting Systems   0.5    0.4    0.8    0.4    2.2    1.7    1.8    0.9    6.6 
Other   0.8    0.1    0.1    0.2    1.1    0.0    0.0    0.0    1.1 
Total   $     3.6   $     1.9   $     1.4   $     0.8   $     7.7   $     1.8   $     1.8   $     1.0   $   12.3 

 

During 2013, Optex Systems Holdings received orders totaling $10.3 million consisting of $8.8 million from several customers primarily in support of our periscope product line, $0.8 million in Sighting Systems, and $0.7 million in the other product group. New orders booked in fiscal year 2013, are deliverable primarily in fiscal year 2014.

  

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We are aggressively pursuing additional periscope business. While the U.S. periscope market has experienced an overall declined since 2009, Optex has mitigated a significant portion of the reduced U.S. military orders through increased market share in both foreign and domestic defense contractor markets. In July 2012, Optex System’s primary competitor in plastic periscopes (Miller-Holzwarth) shut down its manufacturing due to what we believe to be reduced U.S. military orders combined with unmet financial obligations. We were able to team with other bidders and as a result purchased approximately $375 thousand worth of abandoned assets in a trustee bankruptcy auction to use in our ongoing business.

 

In addition, there continues to be uncertainty in future U.S. military spending over the next 10 years pending Congressional resolution of the sequestration cuts to defense spending which began in fiscal year 2013. The potential ramifications of the circumstances surrounding the 2012 Congressional budget sequestration have resulted in yet more uncertainty and potential cuts in spending by the U.S. military, and we have had to explore other avenues of revenue. As a result of new periscope orders from non-traditional sources and an aggressive pursuit of increased market share for all of our existing product lines, we were able to mitigate much of the current decreased U.S. government requirements in fiscal year 2013 with other new business, such as the new $8.0 million contract for M36 Digital Day and Night vision (DDAN). We are exploring new opportunities in M17 day thermal periscopes as well as thermal camera’s for commercial applications. We also continue to explore other opportunities for manufacturing outside of our traditional product lines for products which could be manufactured using our existing lines in order to fully utilize our existing capacity. Despite the improved performance in fiscal year 2013, and given the sizable reduction in backlog entering fiscal year 2014, we do not anticipate being able to fully offset the reduced government spending with alternative business in the next twelve months.

 

A majority of our contracts are prime or subcontracted directly with the Federal government and, as such, are subject to Federal Acquisition Regulation Subpart 49.5, “Contract Termination Clauses” and more specifically Federal Acquisition Regulation  clauses 52.249-2 “Termination for Convenience of the Government Fixed-Price)”, and 49.504 “Termination of fixed-price contracts for default”.  These clauses are standard clauses on our prime military contracts and generally apply to us as subcontractors.  It has been our experience that the termination for convenience is rarely invoked, except where it is mutually beneficial for both parties.  We are currently not aware of any pending terminations for convenience or for default on our existing contracts.

 

 By way of background, the Federal Acquisition Regulation is the principal set of regulations that govern the acquisition process of government agencies and contracts with the U.S. government. In general, parts of the Federal Acquisition Regulation are incorporated into government solicitations and contracts by reference as terms and conditions effecting contract awards and pricing solicitations.

 

In the event a termination for convenience were to occur, Federal Acquisition Regulation  clause 52.249-2 provides for full recovery of all contractual costs and profits reasonably occurred up to and as a result of the terminated contract. In the event a termination for default were to occur, we could be liable for any excess cost incurred by the government to acquire supplies from another supplier similar to those terminated from us. We would not be liable for any excess costs if the failure to perform the contract arises from causes beyond the control and without the fault or negligence of the company as defined by Federal Acquisition Regulation  clause 52.249-8. In addition, the Government may require us to transfer title and deliver to the Government any completed supplies, partially completed supplies and materials, parts, tools, dies, jigs, fixtures, plans, drawings, information, and contract rights that we have specifically produced or acquired for the terminated portion of this contract. The Government shall pay contract price for completed supplies delivered and accepted, and we and the Government would negotiate an agreed upon amount of payment for manufacturing materials delivered and accepted and for the protection and preservation of the property. Failure to agree on an amount for manufacturing materials is subject to the Federal Acquisition Regulation Disputes clause 52.233-1. 

 

In some cases, we may receive an “undefinitized” (i.e., price, specifications and terms are not agreed upon before performance commenced) contract award for contracts that exceed the $700,000, which is the federal government simplified acquisition threshold.  These contracts are considered firm contracts at an undefinitized, but not to exceed specified limits threshold.  Cost Accounting Standards Board covered contracts are subject to the Truth in Negotiations Act disclosure requirements and downward only price negotiation.  As of September 29, 2013, none of our outstanding backlog fell under this criterion. 

 

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Twelve month period ended September 29, 2013 compared to the twelve month period ended September 30, 2012

 

Revenues:

 

The table below details the revenue changes by product line for the year ended September 29, 2013 as compared to the year ended September 30, 2012.

 

   Twelve months ended 
   (Millions) 
Product Line  Sept 29, 2013   Sep 30, 2012   Variance   % Chg 
Howitzer  $   $1.7   $(1.7)  (100.0)
Periscopes   13.0    10.8    2.2    20.4 
Sighting Systems   1.9    1.0    0.9    90.0 
Other   2.2    0.8    1.4    175.0 
Total  $17.1   $14.3   $2.8   19.6 

 

Despite the downturn in U.S. government spending, our total revenues increased by $2.8 million or 19.6% in 2013 over 2012 levels. The increased revenue is primarily due to the production ramp up of the new $8 million M36 Digital Day Night sighting systems program awarded in fiscal year 2012, increased plastic periscope business related to customer base expansion due to closure of our primary periscope competitor, and deliveries against a new gunner head assembly program to the U.S. Government in 2013. These increases were partially offset by a decrease in Howitzer programs resulting from completion of the contract in fiscal year 2012. Despite the improved performance in fiscal year 2013, and given the sizable reduction in backlog entering fiscal year 2014, it is unlikely we will be able to fully offset the reduced government spending with alternative business in the next twelve months.

 

Revenue increased by $2.2 million or 20.4% on our periscope line during fiscal year 2013 as compared to fiscal year 2012. During the period, Optex Systems experienced increased business in support of foreign orders for plastic periscopes and increased revenues for new customers as a result of the plant closure of our primary periscope competitor, Miller-Holzwarth, Inc., in 2012. Although the U.S. periscope revenue has been declining since 2009, we have been able to offset U.S. spending declines with a larger market share with foreign customers and domestic defense contractors.  We are currently developing new day and night vision periscopes which we hope to market to both domestic and foreign customers. We continue to quote and receive awards for additional periscopes from multiple customers and are aggressively pursuing increased market share in the periscope market by picking up business from the Miller-Holzwarth plant closure. We cannot yet determine if we will be successful in gaining sufficient new additional periscope business to offset any additional reductions that could result from further 2014 budget sequestration defense cuts. Based on our current backlog demand as compared to the prior year position, we expect fiscal year 2014 revenue could decline by as much as 25-35% from the fiscal year 2013 level if we are unable to successfully obtain enough new orders to offset the declining the U.S. military demand. 

 

Revenues from the Howitzer programs decreased $(1.7) million, or (100.0)% over the prior year.  The decline in revenue is primarily due to completion of the M137 Howitzer program in March 2012 with no current follow-on contracts. Currently, we do not foresee any material, near term orders for additional Howitzer product; however, we anticipate possible new orders in the program as current military supplies diminish and require replacement in the longer term.

 

Sighting systems revenues increased $0.9 million, or 90.0%, over the prior year, due to deliveries of the first series of production units against the five year M36 contract. We expect deliveries on sighting systems to continue at the higher rate as full production levels have been reached against the M36 contract. The first article inspection for this program was completed in the final quarter of fiscal 2012 and the first production ready units were submitted to the customer in December 2012. Deliveries against the program are contracted to continue at a rate of approximately $1.6 million per year thereafter through contract completion. The customer has agreed to accept an accelerated delivery schedule throughout the balance of the contract of up to $2.6 million per year, at no penalty to Optex or additional cost to the customer. Optex is currently reviewing the proposal for possible increases in fiscal year 2014 revenue and production resource requirements. In addition, we continue to ship small sighting systems orders pursuant to other contracts to both federal government and non-U.S. government customers and continue to pursue business on several substantial programs for commander weapon sighting systems and M36 thermal sighting units.

 

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Increases in the other product lines were $1.4 million, or 175.0%, for the year ending September 29, 2013 compared to the year ending September 30, 2012. The higher revenue is primarily due to shipments of gunner head assemblies to Defense Logistics Agency for $1.1 million, completing the contract, and $0.3 million in revenues for new and development programs with several new customers related to optical cells and the Stryker Armored Vehicle Simulator periscopes. Revenues in the next twelve months are expected to decline by up to 30% from fiscal year 2013 levels due to the downturn in U.S. military spending combined with completion of the gunner head assemblies in fiscal year 2012.

 

Cost of Goods Sold. During the fiscal year ended September 29, 2013, we recorded cost of goods sold of $13.9 million as compared to $11.8 million during the fiscal year ended September 30, 2012, an increase of $2.1 million or 17.8%. The gross margin during the period ending September 29, 2013 was 18.7% of revenue as compared to a gross margin of 16.8% of revenue for the period ending September 30, 2012. The increased cost of sales and increase in gross margin percentage for the year as compared to the prior year is primarily due the increase in revenue of $2.8 million combined with a shift in product mix toward more profitable programs, primarily in the last fiscal quarter of 2013.

 

G&A Expenses.  During the fiscal year ended September 29, 2013, we recorded operating expenses of $3.0 million as opposed to $2.7 million during the period ending September 30, 2012, an increase of $0.3 million or 11.1%.  Operating expenses are higher than the previous year period due to increases in research and development expenses of $0.2 million and increased spending of legal expenses of $0.1 million, in support of services related to the outstanding Howitzer equitable adjustment claim, and an unsuccessful bid protest filed in 2013. We expect the spending level of general and administrative costs to decline by approximately $0.4 to $0.5 million in fiscal year 2014, primarily in research and development, legal expenses and other discretionary spending accounts in anticipation of lower revenue volume.

 

Operating Income (Loss).  During the period ending September 29, 2013, we recorded a net operating income of $0.26 million, as compared to an operating loss of ($0.30) million during the period ending September 30, 2012.  The change in operating income of $0.56 million is primarily due to higher gross margins of $0.8 million related to increased revenues on more profitable programs, partially offset with increased general and administrative spending of $(0.24) million.

 

Net Income (Loss) applicable to common shareholders.  During the period ended September 29, 2013, we recorded a net income of $0.14 million, as compared to a net loss of ($0.26) million for the period September 30, 2012. The change in net income of $0.40 million is primarily attributable to higher operating profit of $0.56 million offset by changes in the accrued dividends on preferred stock of $(0.11) million due to the waiver in February 2012 and increased deferred taxes of $(0.03) million and increased interest expense of $(0.02) million.

 

Liquidity and Capital Resources

 

In April 2012, the Company amended its revolving credit facility with Avidbank. The new renewable revolving maturity date is July 15, 2014. The facility provides up to $1 million in financing against eligible receivables for up to two years. The material terms of the amended revolving credit facility are as follows:

 

The interest rate for all advances shall be the greater of 7.0% and the then in effect prime rate plus 3.5%. The additional minimum interest payment requirement has been eliminated.

 

Interest shall be paid monthly in arrears.

 

The loan period is from July 15th through July 14th of the following year, beginning with the period of July 15, 2012 through July 14, 2013 and a revolving loan maturity date of July 14, 2014, at which time any outstanding advances, and accrued and unpaid interest thereon, will be due and payable.

 

A renewal fee of $10,000 is due on the 15th day of April each year beginning with April 15, 2012.

 

The obligations of Optex Systems, Inc. to Avidbank are secured by a first lien on all of its assets (including intellectual property assets should it have any in the future) in favor of Avidbank.

 

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The facility contains customary events of default. Upon the occurrence of an event of default that remains uncured after any applicable cure period, Avidbank’s commitment to make further advances may terminate, and Avidbank would also be entitled to pursue other remedies against Optex Systems, Inc. and the pledged collateral.

 

Pursuant to a guaranty executed by Optex Systems Holdings in favor of Avidbank, Optex Systems Holdings has guaranteed all obligations of Optex Systems, Inc. to Avidbank.

 

The facility contains a requirement for the Company to maintain a zero balance on the revolving line for a period of at least 30 consecutive days during each loan period.

 

As of September 29, 2013, the outstanding balance on the line of credit was $858 thousand.  For the years ended September 29, 2013 and September 30, 2012, the total interest expense against the outstanding line of credit balance was $42 thousand and $19 thousand, respectively. 

 

We have historically met our liquidity requirements from a variety of sources, including government and customer funding through contract progress bills, milestone invoices, short term loans, notes from related parties, and the sale of equity securities. Based upon our current working capital position and potential for expanded business revenues, we believe that our working capital is sufficient to fund our current operations for at least the next 12 months. However, based on our strategy and the anticipated growth in our business, we believe that our liquidity needs may increase in the future. The amount of such increase will depend on many factors, including the costs associated with the fulfillment of our projects, whether we upgrade our technology, and the amount of inventory required for our expanding business. If our liquidity needs do increase, we believe additional capital resources will be obtained from a variety of sources including, but not limited to, cash flow from operations and the issuance of our common stock and/or debt, including receivables funding through a commercial lender .

 

In addition, Optex Systems Holdings has requested an equitable adjustment on a previously completed Howitzer program due to significant design issues that impacted the manufacturability of the product. As there is no guarantee that the request will be granted in part or in full, we realized the entire loss in fiscal year 2010. The requested equitable adjustment claim was formally rejected by the contracting agency on May 31, 2012; however, Optex Systems Holdings has appealed the decision with the Armed Services Board of Contract Appeals (ASBCA). While we remain optimistic that Optex has a justifiable claim, we cannot predict the outcome of the appeal will be successful. In the event we are unsuccessful in obtaining an equitable adjustment settlement, there will be no future margin impact for on these programs as the losses have been previously recognized through the completion of the program.  To the extent we are able to recover increased costs (losses) against the program; we expect the settlement would have a positive impact on working capital.

 

Period of September 30, 2012 through September 29, 2013

 

 Cash and Cash Equivalents.  As of September 29, 2013, we had cash and cash equivalents of $0.9 million as compared to $1.7 million on September 30, 2012. We decreased cash and cash equivalents by $(0.8) million primarily due to increased accounts receivable related to timing of collections of $(1.3) million, and increased inventory in support of the new M36 Day night program of $(0.6) million offset by borrowing against the outstanding line of credit of $0.9 million and net income of $0.1 million. As of September 29, 2013 our outstanding balance on the line of credit was $0.9 million.

 

Net Cash (Used by) Provided by Operating Activities.  Net cash (used) by operating activities during the period beginning September 30, 2012 and ending September 29, 2013 totaled $(1.5) million. The primary uses of cash during this period were inventories purchased in support of the M36 Digital Day and Night Vision program of $(0.6) million and increases in accounts receivable of $(1.3) million related to timing of collections for fiscal quarter four shipments. These uses were offset by $0.1 million of net income and $0.3 million of positive cash impacts from other operating accounts.

 

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Net Cash (Used) by Investing Activities.  In the twelve months ended September 29, 2013, total cash used in investing activities was $(0.91) due to the purchase of property and equipment for $(0.12) million and the amortization of prepaid royalties of $0.03 million of the prior year purchased patent license..

 

Net Cash Provided by Financing Activities. Net cash provided by financing activities totaled $0.9 million during the twelve months ended September 30, primarily due to borrowing against the line of credit in fiscal year 2013.

 

Critical Accounting Policies

 

Stock-Based Compensation: In December 2004, FASB issued FASB ASC 718 which establishes standards for the accounting for transactions in which an entity exchanges its equity instruments for goods or services.  It also addresses transactions in which an entity incurs liabilities in exchange for goods or services that are based on the fair value of the entity’s equity instruments or that may be settled by the issuance of those equity instruments.  FASB ASC 718 focuses primarily on accounting for transactions in which an entity obtains employee services in share-based payment transactions.  FASB ASC 718  requires that the compensation cost relating to share-based payment transactions be recognized in the financial statements.  That cost will be measured based on the fair value of the equity or liability instruments issued.

 

 Optex Systems Holdings’ accounting policy for equity instruments issued to consultants and vendors in exchange for goods and services follows the provisions of FASB ASC 505-50, which establish the measurement date for the fair value of the equity instruments issued is determined at the earlier of (i) the date at which a commitment for performance by the consultant or vendor is reached or (ii) the date at which the consultant or vendor’s performance is complete. In the case of equity instruments issued to consultants, the fair value of the equity instrument is recognized over the term of the consulting agreement.  Stock-based compensation related to non-employees is accounted for based on the fair value of the related stock or options or the fair value of the services, whichever is more readily determinable in accordance with FASB ASC 718.

 

Income Tax/Deferred Tax: FASB ASC 740 requires recognition of deferred tax assets and liabilities for the expected future tax consequences of events that have been included in the financial statements or tax returns. Under this method, deferred tax assets and liabilities are determined based on differing treatment of items for financial reporting and income tax reporting purposes.  The deferred tax balances are adjusted to reflect tax rates by tax jurisdiction, based on currently enacted tax laws, which will be in effect in the years in which the temporary differences are expected to reverse. We have provided deferred income tax benefits on net operating loss carry-forwards to the extent we believe we will be able to utilize them in future tax filings.

 

Revenue RecognitionOptex Systems Holdings recognizes revenue based on the modified percentage of completion method utilizing the units-of-delivery method, in accordance with FASB ASC 605-35.

 

The units-of-delivery method recognizes as revenue the contract price of units of a basic production product delivered during a period and as the cost of earned revenue the costs allocable to the delivered units. Costs allocable to undelivered units are reported in the balance sheet as inventory or work in progress. The method is used in circumstances in which an entity produces units of a basic product under production-type contracts in a continuous or sequential production process to buyers’ specifications.

 

Optex Systems Holdings contracts are fixed price production type contracts whereby a defined order quantity is delivered to the customer during a continuous or sequential production process tailored to the buyer’s specifications (build to print).  Optex Systems Holdings’ deliveries against these contracts generally occur in monthly increments across fixed delivery periods spanning from 3 to 36 months.

 

Optex Systems Holdings may at times have contracts that allow for invoicing based on achievement of milestone events. In such cases, Optex Systems Inc. recognizes revenue based on the milestone method in accordance with FASB ASC 605-28, as applicable. On October 24, 2011, Optex Systems Inc. was awarded an $8.0 million contract with General Dynamics Land Systems - Canada which provides for milestone invoices up to a total of $3.9 million as outlined in the summarized contract table below. In accordance with FASB 605-28, Optex Systems, Inc. recognizes milestone payments as revenue upon completion of a substantive milestone as commensurate with the following guidelines: our performance to achieve the milestone, the milestone relates solely to past performance and is reasonable relative to all of the deliverables and payment terms within the arrangement. Milestones are not considered as substantive if any portion of the associated milestone consideration relates to the remaining deliverables in the unit of accounting. Non-substantive milestone payments are reported as a liability on the balance sheet as Short Term and Long Term Customer Advance Deposits.

 

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The following table depicts the current contract milestone schedule as of September 29, 2013.

 

      Thousands 
Milestone Event  Estimated 
Completion / 
Invoice Date
  Revenue   Customer 
Deposits / 
Liability
 
            
Start of Work Meeting 
System Functional Review 
Production Start of Work
  Complete  $34.4   $552.9 
              
Delivery of Two Prototypes  Complete   63.7    61.8 
              
Preliminary Design Review 
PRM #1 (Meeting) Production 
Readiness Review
  Complete   25.0    1,032.4 
              
Critical Design Review 
PRM #2 (Meeting)
  Complete   25.0    150.0 
              
Placement of Long Lead Material (LLM)  Complete   25.0    100.4 
              
Delivery of Two Engineering Development Units  Complete   55.0    100.0 
              
Delivery of One Production Ready Unit  Complete   68.2    125.6 
              
PRM #3 (Meeting)  Complete   84.2    570.0 
              
FAT and PCA Complete  Complete   275.2    449.4 
              
Delivery of Two Final Production Ready Units  Complete       125.6 
              
Total Contract Milestones     $655.7   $3,268.1 
              
Less: Liquidated Milestones (shipments)           (564.1)
              
Total Customer Advance Deposits/Milestones          $2,704.0 

  

In year ending September 29, 2013, there was zero recognized revenue as a result of achieving substantive milestone events and Optex Systems, Inc. collected $575 thousand in customer deposits for completed milestones. In year ending September 30, 2012, Optex Systems, Inc. recognized $656 thousand of revenue as a result of achieving substantive milestone events and collected $2,720 thousand in customer deposits for completed milestones. As of September 29, 2013 all of the milestone events were completed and there were no unpaid/invoiced customer deposits related to the completed milestone events. 

 

 Customer Advance Deposits: Customer advance deposits represent amounts collected from customers in advance of shipment or revenue recognition which relate to undelivered product due to non-substantive milestone payments or other cash in advance payment terms. As of September 29, 2013, Optex Systems, Inc. had a balance of $2.7 million in customer advance deposits related to non-substantive milestone billings. The terms of the contract extend through 2017 during which time we are required to purchase the necessary materials to fulfill the delivery of products required by the contract. Of the total collected customer advance deposits, $0.8 million related to short term customer advance deposits for deliveries to occur within the next twelve months and $1.9 million related long term customer advance deposits for deliveries occurring after September 2014.

 

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Estimated Costs at Completion and Accrued Loss on Contracts:  Optex Systems Holdings reviews and reports on the performance of its contracts and production orders against the respective resource plans for such contracts/orders. These reviews are summarized in the form of estimates at completion. Estimates at completion include Optex Systems Holdings’ incurred costs to date against the contract/order plus management’s current estimates of remaining amounts for direct labor, material, other direct costs and subcontract support and indirect overhead costs based on the completion status and future contractual requirements for each order.

If an estimate at completion indicates a potential overrun against budgeted resources for a fixed price contract/order, management first attempts to implement lower cost solutions that will profitably meet the requirements of the fixed price contract. If such solutions do not appear practicable, management makes a determination whether to seek renegotiation of contract or order requirements from the customer. If neither cost reduction nor renegotiation appears probable, an accrual for the contract loss/overrun is recorded against earnings and the loss is recognized in the first period the loss is identified based on the most recent estimates at completion of the particular contract or product order.

 

During 2010, Optex Systems Holdings realized increased losses against the Howitzer programs of $1.1 million of which $0.8 million related specifically to production issues encountered on one of our Howitzer product lines.  Increased losses were primarily attributable to manufacturing issues on our U.S. government Howitzers culminating in higher material scrap and labor hours, combined with a reduction in total production volume in 2010 which further impacted production efficiencies across all product lines.  Optex Systems Holdings has requested an equitable adjustment on this program due to significant design issues impacting the manufacturability of the product.  As there is no guarantee that the request will be granted in part or in full, we realized the entire loss in fiscal year 2010. The requested equitable adjustment claim was formally rejected by the contracting agency on May 31, 2012; however, Optex Systems Holdings has appealed the decision with the Armed Services Board of Contract Appeals (ASBCA). While we remain optimistic that Optex has a justifiable claim, we cannot predict the outcome of the appeal will be successful. In the event we are unsuccessful in obtaining an equitable adjustment settlement, there will be no future margin impact for on these programs as the losses have been previously recognized through the completion of the program.

 

Government Contracts: Many of our contracts are prime or subcontracted directly with the Federal government and as such, are subject to Federal Acquisition Regulation Subpart 49.5, “Contract Termination Clauses” and more specifically Federal Acquisition Regulation clauses 52.249-2  “Termination for Convenience of the Government (Fixed-Price)”, and 49.504 “Termination of fixed-price contracts for default”. 

 

Warranty Costs: Some of Optex Systems Holdings’ customers require that the company warrant the quality of its products to meet customer requirements and be free of defects for up to fifteen months subsequent to delivery.   Future warranty costs are based on the estimated cost of replacement for expected returns based upon our most recent experience rate of defects as a percentage of warranty covered sales. Throughout the year, warranty costs are expensed as incurred, and as of each year end, Optex Systems Holdings reviews the prior 15 month warranty experience rate and may adjust the warranty accrual as required to cover any additional anticipated warranty costs related to prior shipments. As of September 29, 2013 and September 30, 2012, the existing warranty reserve balance of $25 thousand was reviewed and determined to be adequate to satisfy any future warranty claims that may have existed as of the end of each fiscal year for shipments occurring in the prior 15 months.

  

Recent Accounting Pronouncements.

 

In July 2013, FASB issued ASU 2013-11—Income Taxes (ASC Topic 740): “Presentation of an Unrecognized Tax Benefit When a Net Operating Loss Carryforward, a Similar Tax Loss, or a Tax Credit Carryforward Exists (a consensus of the FASB Emerging Issues Task Force)”. The amendments in this update provide explicit guidance on the financial statement presentation of an unrecognized tax benefit when a net operating loss carryforward, a similar tax loss, or a tax credit carryforward exists at the reporting date. The update is effective for fiscal years, and interim periods within those years, beginning after December 15, 2013. As such, Optex Systems Holdings is required to adopt these provisions at the beginning of the interim period ending March 30, 2014. Optex Systems Holdings is currently evaluating the impact of FASB ASU 2013-11 but does not expect the adoption thereof to have a material effect on Optex Systems Holdings’ financial statements.

 

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In April 2011, FASB issued ASC 820 “Amendments to Achieve Common Fair Value Measurement and Disclosure Requirements in U.S. GAAP and IFRSs” which describe and clarify many of the requirements in U.S. GAAP for measuring fair value and for disclosing information about fair value. The amendments in this update result in common fair value measurement and disclosure requirements in U.S. GAAP and IFRS. FASB ASC 820 is effective for financial statements of public entities that are issued for fiscal years and interim periods beginning after December 15, 2011. As such, Optex Systems Holdings adopted these provisions at the beginning of the interim period ending April 1, 2012.  Adoption of FASB ASC 820 did not have a material effect on Optex Systems Holding’s financial statements.

 

Cautionary Factors That May Affect Future Results

 

This Report on Form 10-K and other written reports and oral statements made from time to time by Optex Systems Holdings may contain so-called “forward-looking statements,” all of which are subject to risks and uncertainties. You can identify these forward-looking statements by their use of words such as “expects,” “plans,” “will,” “estimates,” “forecasts,” “projects” and other words of similar meaning. You can identify them by the fact that they do not relate strictly to historical or current facts. These statements are likely to address Optex Systems Holdings’ growth strategy, financial results and product and development programs. You must carefully consider any such statement and should understand that many factors could cause actual results to differ from Optex Systems Holdings’ forward-looking statements. These factors include inaccurate assumptions and a broad variety of other risks and uncertainties, including some that are known and some that are not. No forward-looking statement can be guaranteed and actual future results may vary materially.

 

We do not assume the obligation to update any forward-looking statement. You should carefully evaluate such statements in light of factors described in this prospectus. In this prospectus Optex Systems Holdings has identified important factors that could cause actual results to differ from expected or historic results. You should understand that it is not possible to predict or identify all such factors. Consequently, you should not consider any such list to be a complete list of all potential risks or uncertainties.

 

Item 8  Financial Statements and Supplementary Data

 

REPORT OF INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM

 

To the Board of Directors and

Stockholders of Optex Systems Holdings, Inc.

 

Richardson, Texas

 

We have audited the accompanying consolidated balance sheets of Optex Systems Holdings, Inc. (the Company) as of September 29, 2013 and the related consolidated statements of operations, stockholders’ equity, and cash flows for the year ended September 29, 2013. The Company’s management is responsible for these consolidated financial statements. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on these consolidated financial statements based on our audits. The consolidated financial statements of Optex Systems Holdings, Inc. as of and for the year ended September 30, 2012 were audited by other auditors whose report dated December 19, 2012 expressed an unqualified opinion on those consolidated financial statements.

 

We conducted our audits in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States). Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement. The Company is not required to have, nor were we engaged to perform, an audit of its internal control over financial reporting. Our audit included consideration of internal control over financial reporting as a basis for designing audit procedures that are appropriate in the circumstances, but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the company’s internal control over financial reporting. Accordingly, we express no such opinion. An audit also includes examining, on a test basis, evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements, assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall financial statement presentation. We believe that our audit provides a reasonable basis for our opinion.

 

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In our opinion, the consolidated financial statements referred to above present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of Optex Systems Holdings, Inc. as of September 29, 2013, and the results of its operations and its cash flows for the year then ended in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America.

 

/s/PMB Helin Donovan, LLP  
   
PMB Helin Donovan, LLP  
______________________  

December 19, 2013

 

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REPORT OF INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM

 

To the Board of Directors and
Stockholders of Optex Systems Holdings, Inc.

We have audited the accompanying consolidated balance sheet of Optex Systems Holdings, Inc. (the Company) as of September 30, 2012, and the related consolidated statements of operations, stockholders’ equity, and cash flows for the year then ended. The Company’s management is responsible for these consolidated financial statements. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on these consolidated financial statements based on our audit.

We conducted our audit in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States). Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement. The Company is not required to have, nor were we engaged to perform, an audit of its internal control over financial reporting. Our audit included consideration of internal control over financial reporting as a basis for designing audit procedures that are appropriate in the circumstances, but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the company’s internal control over financial reporting. Accordingly, we express no such opinion. An audit also includes examining, on a test basis, evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements, assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall financial statement presentation. We believe that our audit provides a reasonable basis for our opinion.

In our opinion, the consolidated financial statements referred to above present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of Optex Systems Holdings, Inc. as of September 30, 2012, and the results of its operations and its cash flows for the year then ended in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America.

/s/ EFP Rotenberg, LLP

EFP Rotenberg, LLP
Rochester, New York
December 19, 2012

 

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Optex Systems Holdings, Inc.

Consolidated Balance Sheets

 

   (Thousands, except share data) 
   September 29, 2013   September 30, 2012 
         
ASSETS          
           
Current Assets          
Cash  $882   $1,653 
Accounts Receivable   3,118    1,843 
Net Inventory   7,579    7,094 
Prepaid Expenses   36    28 
Total Current Assets  $11,615   $10,618 
           
Property and Equipment          
Property Plant and Equipment  $1,704   $1,584 
Accumulated Depreciation   (1,460)   (1,392)
Total Property and Equipment  $244   $192 
           
Other Assets          
Deferred Tax Asset - Long Term  $1,077   $1,157 
Prepaid Royalties - Long Term   180    210 
Security Deposits   21    21 
Total Other Assets  $1,278   $1,388 
           
 Total Assets  $13,137   $12,198 
           
LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY          
           
Current Liabilities          
Accounts Payable  $989   $1,109 
Accrued Expenses   706    754 
Accrued Warranties   25    25 
Customer Advance Deposits - Short Term   769    776 
Credit Facility   858    - 
Total Current Liabilities  $3,347   $2,664 
           
Other Liabilities          
Customer Advance Deposits - Long Term   1,935    1,944 
           
Total Other Liabilities  $1,935   $1,944 
           
Total Liabilities  $5,282   $4,608 
           
Stockholders’ Equity          
Optex Systems Holdings, Inc.  Preferred Stock ($0.001 par 5,000 authorized,  1,016 and 1,027 series A preferred issued and outstanding, respectively. Preferred shares had a liquidation preference of $6,970,105 at September 29, 2013.)        
Optex Systems Holdings, Inc. – (par $0.001, 2,000,000,000 authorized, 157,346,607 and 152,346,607 shares issued and outstanding, respectively)  $157   $152 
Additional Paid-in-capital   17,922    17,799 
Retained Earnings (Deficit)   (10,224)   (10,361)
           
Total Stockholders’ Equity  $7,855   $7,590 
           
Total Liabilities and Stockholders’ Equity  $13,137   $12,198 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements

 

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Optex Systems Holdings, Inc.

Consolidated Statements of Operations

 

   (Thousands, except common share data) 
   Twelve months ended 
   September 29, 2013   September 30, 2012 
         
Revenues  $17,070   $14,254 
           
Total Cost of Sales   13,861    11,849 
           
Gross Margin  $3,209   $2,405 
           
General and Administrative   2,950    2,705 
           
Operating Income (Loss)  $259   $(300)
           
Other Expenses          
           
Interest Expense - Net   42    19 
Total Other  $42   $19 
           
Income Before Taxes  $217   $(319)
           
Deferred Income Taxes (Benefit)   80    48 
           
Net Income (Loss) After Taxes  $137   $(367)
           
Less preferred stock dividend (accrued) waived  $   $106 
           
Net income (loss) applicable to common shareholders  $137   $(261)
           
Basic income (loss) per share  $0.0009   $(0.0018)
           
Weighted average common shares outstanding - Basic   154,997,706    143,496,377 
           
Potentially diluted income (loss) per share  $0.0002   $(0.0018)
           
Weighted average common shares outstanding - Potentially diluted   904,749,343    143,496,377 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements

 

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Optex Systems Holdings, Inc.

Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows

 

   (Thousands) 
   Twelve months ended 
   September 29, 2013   September 30, 2012 
         
Cash flows from operating activities:          
Net income (loss)  $137   $(367)
           
Adjustments to reconcile net loss to net cash (used in)/provided by operating activities:          
Depreciation and amortization   69    165 
Provision for allowance for inventory valuation   149    328 
(Increase) decrease in deferred tax asset (net of valuation allowance)   80    48 
Noncash interest expense (income)       (16)
Stock option compensation expense   128    152 
Changes in operating assets and liabilities:          
(Increase) decrease  in accounts receivable   (1,276)   549 
(Increase) decrease in inventory (net of progress billed)   (634)   (3,334)
(Increase) decrease in prepaid expenses   (8)   (11)
Increase (decrease) in accounts payable and accrued expenses   (165)   612 
Increase (decrease) in customer advance deposits   (16)   2,720 
Increase (decrease) in accrued estimated loss on contracts   (2)   2 
Total adjustments  $(1,675)  $1,215 
Net cash (used in)/provided by operating activities  $(1,538)  $848 
           
Cash flows from investing activities:          
(Increase) decrease in prepaid royalties - long term   30    (210)
Purchased of property and equipment   (121)   (96)
Net cash (used in) provided by investing activities  $(91)  $(306)
           
Cash flows from financing activities:          
 Proceeds (to) from credit facility (net)   858    (507)
 Proceeds from issuance of common stock       50 
 Proceeds from warrant exercise       54 
           
Net cash (used In) provided by financing activities  $858   $(403)
           
Net increase (decrease) in cash and cash equivalents  $(771)  $139 
Cash and cash equivalents at beginning of period   1,653    1,514 
Cash and cash equivalents at end of period  $882   $1,653 
           
Supplemental cash flow information:          
Cash paid for interest  $42   $35 
           
Supplemental noncash financing information:          
Exchange of preferred stock for common stock  $50   $25 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements

 

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Optex Systems Holdings, Inc.

Consolidated Statement of Stockholders’ Equity

 

(Thousands, except share data)

 

   Common   Series A           Additional       Total 
   Shares   Preferred   Common   Preferred   Paid in   Retained   Stockholders 
   Outstanding   Shares   Stock   Series A Stock   Capital   Earnings   Equity 
                             
Balance at October 2, 2011   139,444,940    1,027   $139   $1    17,662    (10,100)   7,702 
Stock Option Compensation Expense                       152         152 
Accumulated Dividends on Preferred Stock                       (106)   106     
Sales of Common Stock   5,000,000         5         45         50 
Conversion of Preferred Stock   2,500,000    (4)  $3   $(1)  $(3)       $(1)
Exercise of Warrants   5,401,667        5         49         54 
Net loss                            (367)   (367)
                                    
Balance at September 30, 2012   152,346,607    1,023   $152   $   $17,799   $(10,361)  $7,590 
                                    
Stock Option Compensation Expense                       128         128 
Conversion of Preferred Stock   5,000,000    (7)  $5   $   $(5)       $ 
Net income                            137    137 
                                    
Balance at September 29, 2013   157,346,607    1,016   $157   $   $17,922   $(10,224)  $7,855 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements

 

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Note 1 - Organization and Operations

 

On March 30, 2009, Optex Systems Holdings, Inc. (formerly known as Sustut Exploration, Inc.), a Delaware corporation (“Optex Systems Holdings”), along with Optex Systems, Inc., a privately held Delaware corporation (“Optex Systems, Inc. “), which is a wholly-owned subsidiary of Optex Systems Holdings, entered into a reorganization agreement, pursuant to which Optex Systems, Inc. was acquired by Optex Systems Holdings in a share exchange transaction. Optex Systems Holdings became the surviving corporation. At the closing, there was a name change from Sustut Exploration, Inc. to Optex Systems Holdings, Inc., and its year end changed from December 31 to a fiscal year ending on the Sunday nearest September 30.

 

On October 14, 2008, certain senior secured creditors of Irvine Sensors Corporation, Longview Fund, L.P. (Longview) and Alpha Capital Anstalt formed Optex Systems, Inc., which acquired all of the assets and assumed certain liabilities of Optex Systems, Inc., a Texas corporation (“Optex Systems, Inc. (Texas)”), and a wholly-owned subsidiary of Irvine Sensors Corporation, in a transaction that was consummated via purchase at a public auction. Following this asset purchase, Optex Systems, Inc. (Texas) remained a wholly-owned subsidiary of Irvine Sensors Corporation.

 

On February 20, 2009, Sileas Corporation (Sileas), a newly-formed Delaware corporation, owned by present members of Optex Systems Holdings’ management, purchased 100% of Longview’s equity and debt interest in Optex Systems, Inc. (Longview’s interest in Optex Systems, Inc. then representing 90% of the issued and outstanding common equity interests in Optex Systems, Inc.), in a private transaction.

 

Optex Systems, Inc. operated as a privately-held Delaware corporation until March 30, 2009, when, as a result of a reverse merger transaction consummated pursuant to a reorganization agreement dated March 30, 2009, it became a wholly-owned subsidiary of Optex Systems Holdings. Sileas is the majority owner (parent) of Optex Systems Holdings, owning approximately 85.0% of the issued and outstanding equity interests in Optex Systems Holdings. The financial statements of Optex Systems Holdings represent subsidiary statements and do not include the accounts of its majority owner.

 

Optex Systems Holdings’ operations are based in Richardson, Texas in a leased facility comprising 49,100 square feet. As of September 29, 2013, Optex Systems Holdings operated with 63 full-time equivalent employees.

 

Optex Systems Holdings manufactures optical sighting systems and assemblies, primarily for Department of Defense and foreign military applications. Its products are installed on a variety of U.S. military land vehicles, such as the Abrams and Bradley fighting vehicles, light armored and advanced security vehicles, and have been selected for installation on the Stryker family of vehicles. Optex Systems Holdings also manufactures and delivers numerous periscope configurations, rifle and surveillance sights and night vision optical assemblies. Optex Systems Holdings’ products consist primarily of build to customer print products that are delivered both directly to the military and to other defense prime contractors.

 

In February 2009, Optex Systems Holdings’ ISO certification status was upgraded from 9001:2000 to 9001:2008, bringing Optex Systems Holdings into compliance with the new ISO standards rewritten to align with ISO 14001.

 

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Note 2 - Accounting Policies

 

Basis of Presentation

 

Principles of Consolidation:  The consolidated financial statements include the accounts of Optex Systems Holdings and its wholly-owned subsidiary, Optex Systems, Inc.  All significant inter-company balances and transactions have been eliminated in consolidation.

 

Use of Estimates:  The preparation of financial statements in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect reported amounts of assets and liabilities and disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statement and the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reporting period. Actual results could differ from the estimates.

 

Segment Reporting: Management has determined that Optex Systems Holdings is organized, managed and internally reported as one business segment. Segments are determined based on differences in products, internal reporting and how operational decisions are made.

 

Fiscal Year:  Optex System Holdings’ fiscal year ends on the Sunday nearest September 30.  Fiscal year 2013 ended on September 29, 2013 and included 52 weeks.  Fiscal year 2012 ended on September 30, 2012 and included 52 weeks. 

 

Fair Value of Financial Instruments:  FASB ASC 825-10 requires disclosure of fair value information about certain financial instruments, including, but not limited to, cash and cash equivalents, accounts receivable, refundable tax credits, prepaid expenses, accounts payable, accrued expenses, notes payable to related parties and convertible debt-related securities. Fair value estimates discussed herein are based upon certain market assumptions and pertinent information available to management as of fiscal years ended September 29, 2013 and September 30, 2012. The carrying value of the balance sheet financial instruments included in Optex Systems Holdings’ consolidated financial statements approximated their fair values.

 

Cash and Cash Equivalents:  For financial statement presentation purposes, Optex Systems Holdings considers those short-term, highly liquid investments with original maturities of three months or less to be cash or cash equivalents.

 

Concentration of Credit Risk: Optex Systems Holdings’ cash and cash equivalents are on deposit with banks. Only a portion of the cash and cash equivalents would be covered by deposit insurance and the uninsured balances are substantially greater than the insured amounts. Although cash and cash equivalent balances exceed insured deposit amounts, management does not anticipate non-performance by the banks.

 

Optex Systems Holdings’ revenues and accounts receivables for fiscal year ended September 29, 2013 are derived from sales to U.S. government agencies (30%), General Dynamics (47%), BAE Systems (12%), and other contractors (11%).  Optex Systems Holdings does not believe that this concentration results in undue credit risk because of the financial strength of the obligees.

 

Accounts Receivable: Optex Systems Holdings records its accounts receivable at the original sales invoice amount less liquidations for previously collected advance/progress bills and an allowance for doubtful accounts. An account receivable is considered to be past due if any portion of the receivable balance is outstanding beyond its scheduled due date. On a quarterly basis, Optex Systems Holdings evaluates its accounts receivable and establishes an allowance for doubtful accounts, based on its history of past write-offs and collections, and current credit conditions. No interest is accrued on past due accounts receivable. As of September 29, 2013, Optex Systems Holdings had an allowance for doubtful accounts of $15 thousand for non U.S. government account balances greater than 120 days. As the customer base was primarily U.S. government and government prime contractors, Optex Systems Holdings had concluded that there was no need for an allowance for doubtful accounts for the year ended September 30, 2012.  Optex Systems Holdings charges uncollectible accounts to bad debt expense in the period as they are first deemed uncollectible.  In the fiscal years 2013 there was $15 thousand, and in 2012, there was zero in bad debt expenses associated with uncollectable accounts. 

 

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Inventory: Inventory is recorded at the lower of cost or market, and adjusted as appropriate for decreases in valuation and obsolescence. Adjustments to the valuation and obsolescence reserves are made after analyzing market conditions, current and projected sales activity, inventory costs and inventory balances to determine appropriate reserve levels. Cost is determined using the first-in first-out method. Under arrangements by which progress payments are received against certain contracts, the customer retains a security interest in the undelivered inventory identified with these contracts.  Payments received for such undelivered inventory are classified as unliquidated progress payments and deducted from the gross inventory balance.  As of September 29, 2013 and September 30, 2012 inventory included:

 

   (Thousands) 
   As of 
September 29, 2013
   As of 
September 30, 2012
 
         
Raw Materials  $6,856   $5,749 
Work in Process   1,901    1,890 
Finished Goods   115    599 
Gross Inventory  $8,872   $8,238 
Less:          
Unliquidated Progress Payments   (62)   (62)
Inventory Reserves   (1,231)   (1,082)
Net Inventory  $7,579   $7,094 

 

Total net inventory increased $485 thousand during the year ended September 29, 2013. The increased net inventory is primarily related to purchases in support of the 5 year General Dynamics M36 contract awarded in October 2011.

 

Optex Systems Holdings conducts an annual work in process inventory in the fourth quarter of each fiscal year and cycle counts raw material and finished goods on a monthly basis.  The accounting records are adjusted to reflect any changes in the physical inventory valuation as compared to the book carrying values based on the results of the physical inventory and cycle counts.  In 2013, Optex Systems Holdings recognized a net inventory adjustment of $74 thousand as compared to a net inventory adjustment in the period ending September 30, 2012 of $166 thousand.  The 2013 adjustment in inventory, was primarily attributable to favorable cost of sales adjustment from improvements in estimated contract gross margins due to lower hours and manufacturing overhead spending as compared to previous projected rates. The 2012 adjustment was primarily attributable to favorable spending in manufacturing overhead resulting in lower cost of sales as compared to estimated rates. Inventory reserves for excess and obsolete inventory increased by $149 thousand over prior year reserve balances primarily due to increases in excess inventory related to completion of the gunner head assembly in 2013.

 

Warranty Costs: Some of Optex Systems Holdings’ customers require that the company warrant the quality of its products to meet customer requirements and be free of defects for up to fifteen months subsequent to delivery.   Future warranty costs are based on the estimated cost of replacement for expected returns based upon our most recent experience rate of defects as a percentage of warranty covered sales. Throughout the year, warranty costs are expensed as incurred, and as of each year end, Optex Systems Holdings reviews the prior 15 month warranty experience rate and may adjust the warranty accrual as required to cover any additional anticipated warranty costs related to prior shipments. As of September 29, 2013 and September 30, 2012, the existing warranty reserve balance of $25 thousand was reviewed and determined to be adequate to satisfy any future warranty claims that may have existed as of the end of each fiscal year for shipments occurring in the prior 15 months.

 

Property and Equipment:  Property and equipment are recorded at cost. Depreciation is computed using the straight line method over the estimated useful lives of the assets, ranging from three to seven years. Expenditures for renewals and betterments are capitalized.  Expenditures for minor items, repairs and maintenance are charged to operations as incurred. Gain or loss upon sale or retirement due to obsolescence is reflected in the operating results in the period the event takes place.

 

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Impairment or Disposal of Long-Lived Assets: Optex Systems Holdings adopted the provisions of FASB ASC 360-10, “ Accounting for the Impairment or Disposal of Long-lived Assets. ”  This standard requires, among other things, that long-lived assets be reviewed for potential impairment whenever events or circumstances indicate that the carrying amounts may not be recoverable. The assessment of possible impairment is based on the ability to recover the carrying value of the asset from the expected future pre-tax cash flows (undiscounted and without interest charges) of the related operations. If these expected cash flows are less than the carrying value of such asset, an impairment loss is recognized for the difference between estimated fair value and carrying value. The primary measure of fair value is based on discounted cash flows. The measurement of impairment requires management to make estimates of these cash flows related to long-lived assets, as well as other fair value determinations.

 

Revenue Recognition:

Optex Systems Holdings recognizes revenue based on the modified percentage of completion method utilizing the units-of-delivery method, in accordance with FASB ASC 605-35:

 

The units-of-delivery method recognizes as revenue the contract price of units of a basic production product delivered during a period and as the cost of earned revenue the costs allocable to the delivered units. Costs allocable to undelivered units are reported in the balance sheet as inventory or work in progress. The method is used in circumstances in which an entity produces units of a basic product under production-type contracts in a continuous or sequential production process to buyers’ specifications.

 

Optex Systems Holdings contracts are fixed price production type contracts whereby a defined order quantity is delivered to the customer during a continuous or sequential production process tailored to the buyer’s specifications (build to print).  Optex Systems Holdings’ deliveries against these contracts generally occur in monthly increments across fixed delivery periods spanning from 3 to 36 months.

 

Optex Systems Holdings may at times have contracts that allow for invoicing based on achievement of milestone events. In such cases, Optex Systems Inc. recognizes revenue based on the milestone method in accordance with FASB ASC 605-28, as applicable. On October 24, 2011, Optex Systems, Inc. was awarded an $8.0 million contract with General Dynamics Land Systems - Canada that provides for milestone invoices up to a total of $3.9 million as outlined in the summarized contract table below. In accordance with FASB 605-28, Optex Systems, Inc. recognizes milestone payments as revenue upon completion of a substantive milestone as commensurate with the following guidelines: our performance to achieve the milestone, the milestone relates solely to past performance and is reasonable relative to all of the deliverables and payment terms within the arrangement. Milestones are not considered as substantive if any portion of the associated milestone consideration relates to the remaining deliverables in the unit of accounting. Non-substantive milestone payments are reported as a liability on the balance sheet as Short Term and Long Term Customer Advance Deposits.

 

The following table depicts the current contract milestone schedule as of September 29, 2013.

 

      Thousands 
Milestone Event  Estimated 
Completion / 
Invoice Date
  Revenue   Customer 
Deposits / 
Liability
 
            
Start of Work Meeting 
System Functional Review 
Production Start of Work
  Complete  $34.4   $552.9 
              
Delivery of Two Prototypes  Complete   63.7    61.8 
              
Preliminary Design Review 
PRM #1 (Meeting) Production 
Readiness Review
  Complete   25.0    1,032.4 
              
Critical Design Review 
PRM #2 (Meeting)
  Complete   25.0    150.0 
              
Placement of Long Lead Material (LLM)  Complete   25.0    100.4 
              
Delivery of Two Engineering Development Units  Complete   55.0    100.0 
              
Delivery of One Production Ready Unit  Complete   68.2    125.6 
              
PRM #3 (Meeting)  Complete   84.2    570.0 
              
FAT and PCA Complete  Complete   275.2    449.4 
              
Delivery of Two Final Production Ready Units  Complete       125.6 
              
Total Contract Milestones     $655.7   $3,268.1 
              
Less: Liquidated Milestones (shipments)           (564.1)
              
Total Customer Advance Deposits/Milestones          $2,704.0 

  

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In year ending September 29, 2013, there was zero recognized revenue as a result of achieving substantive milestone events and Optex Systems, Inc. collected $575 thousand in customer deposits for completed milestones. In year ending September 30, 2012, Optex Systems, Inc. recognized $656 thousand of revenue as a result of achieving substantive milestone events and collected $2,720 thousand in customer deposits for completed milestones. As of September 29, 2013 all of the milestone events were completed and there were no unpaid/invoiced customer deposits related to the completed milestone events. 

 

Customer Advance Deposits: Customer advance deposits represent amounts collected from customers in advance of shipment or revenue recognition which relate to undelivered product due to non-substantive milestone payments or other cash in advance payment terms. As of September 29, 2013, Optex Systems, Inc. had a balance of $2.7 million in customer advance deposits related to non-substantive milestone billings. The terms of the contract extend through 2017 during which time we are required to purchase the necessary materials to fulfill the delivery of products required by the contract. Of the total collected customer advance deposits, $0.8 million related to short term customer advance deposits for deliveries to occur within the next twelve months and $1.9 million related long term customer advance deposits for deliveries occurring after September 2014.

 

Estimated Costs at Completion and Accrued Loss on Contracts:  Optex Systems Holdings reviews and reports on the performance of its contracts and production orders against the respective resource plans for such contracts/orders. These reviews are summarized in the form of estimates at completion. Estimates at completion include Optex Systems Holdings’ incurred costs to date against the contract/order plus management’s current estimates of remaining amounts for direct labor, material, other direct costs and subcontract support and indirect overhead costs based on the completion status and future contractual requirements for each order.

If an estimate at completion indicates a potential overrun against budgeted resources for a fixed price contract/order, management first attempts to implement lower cost solutions that will profitably meet the requirements of the fixed price contract. If such solutions do not appear practicable, management makes a determination whether to seek renegotiation of contract or order requirements from the customer. If neither cost reduction nor renegotiation appears probable, an accrual for the contract loss/overrun is recorded against earnings and the loss is recognized in the first period the loss is identified based on the most recent estimates at completion of the particular contract or product order.

 

During 2010, Optex Systems Holdings realized increased losses against the Howitzer programs of $1.1 million of which $0.8 million related specifically to production issues encountered on one of our Howitzer product lines.  Increased losses were primarily attributable to manufacturing issues on our U.S. government Howitzers culminating in higher material scrap and labor hours, combined with a reduction in total production volume in 2010 which further impacted production efficiencies across all product lines.  Optex Systems Holdings has requested an equitable adjustment on this program due to significant design issues impacting the manufacturability of the product.  As there is no guarantee that the request will be granted in part or in full, we realized the entire loss in fiscal year 2010. The requested equitable adjustment claim was formally rejected by the contracting agency on May 31, 2012; however, Optex Systems Holdings has appealed the decision with the Armed Services Board of Contract Appeals (ASBCA). While we remain optimistic that Optex has a justifiable claim, we cannot predict the outcome of the appeal will be successful. In the event we are unsuccessful in obtaining an equitable adjustment settlement, there will be no future margin impact for on these programs as the losses have been previously recognized through the completion of the program.

 

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Government Contracts:  Many of Optex Systems Holdings’ contracts are prime or subcontracted directly with the Federal government and as such, are subject to Federal Acquisition Regulation (Federal Acquisition Regulation) Subpart 49.5, “Contract Termination Clauses” and more specifically Federal Acquisition Regulation clauses 52.249-2  “Termination for Convenience of the Government (Fixed-Price)”, and 49.504 “Termination of fixed-price contracts for default”.  These clauses are standard clauses on prime military contracts and are generally, “flowed down” to Optex Systems Holdings as subcontractors on other military business.  It has been Optex Systems Holdings’ experience that the termination for convenience is rarely invoked, except where it has been mutually beneficial for both parties.  Optex Systems Holdings is not currently aware of any pending terminations for convenience or default on its existing contracts. 

 

In the event a termination for convenience were to occur, these Federal Acquisition Regulation  clause 52.249-2 provides for full recovery of all contractual costs and profits reasonably incurred up to and as a result of the terminated contract.  In the event a termination for default were to occur, Optex Systems Holdings could be liable for any excess cost incurred by the government to acquire supplies from another supplier similar to those terminated from Optex Systems Holdings.  Optex Systems Holdings would not be liable for any excess costs if the failure to perform the contract arises from causes beyond its control and without its fault or negligence as defined by Federal Acquisition Regulation clause 52.249-8.  In addition, the government may require Optex Systems Holdings to transfer title and deliver to the government any completed supplies, partially completed supplies and materials, parts, tools, dies, jigs, fixtures, plans, drawings, information, and contract rights that Optex Systems Holdings has specifically produced or acquired for the terminated portion of this contract.  The government shall pay contract price for completed supplies delivered and accepted, and Optex Systems Holdings and the government would negotiate an agreed upon amount of payment for manufacturing materials delivered and accepted and for the protection and preservation of the property. Failure to agree on an amount for manufacturing materials is subject to the Federal Acquisition Regulation Disputes clause 52.233-1.

 

In some cases, Optex Systems Holdings may receive orders subject to subsequent price negotiation on contracts exceeding the federal government simplified acquisition threshold of $700,000.  These “undefinitized” contracts are considered firm contracts but as Cost Accounting Standards Board covered contracts, they are subject to the Truth in Negotiations Act disclosure requirements and downward only price negotiation.  As of September 29, 2013 and September 30, 2012, Optex Systems had no booked orders that fell under this criterion.

 

Shipping and Handling Costs: All shipping and handling costs are included as a component of cost of goods sold.

 

Stock-Based Compensation: FASB ASC 718 establishes standards for the accounting for transactions in which an entity exchanges its equity instruments for goods or services, but primarily focuses on transactions whereby an entity obtains employee services for share-based payments. FASB ASC 718 requires that the compensation cost relating to share-based payment transactions be recognized in the financial statements. That cost will be measured based on the fair value of the equity or liability instruments issued. It also addresses transactions in which an entity incurs liabilities in exchange for goods or services that are based on the fair value of the entity’s equity instruments or that may be settled by the issuance of those equity instruments.

 

Optex Systems Holdings’ accounting policy for equity instruments issued to consultants and vendors in exchange for goods and services follows the provisions of FASB ASC 505-50. The measurement date for the fair value of the equity instruments issued is determined at the earlier of (i) the date at which a commitment for performance by the consultant or vendor is reached or (ii) the date at which the consultant or vendor’s performance is complete. In the case of equity instruments issued to consultants, the fair value of the equity instrument is recognized over the term of the consulting agreement. Stock-based compensation related to non-employees is accounted for based on the fair value of the related stock or options or the fair value of the services, whichever is more readily determinable in accordance with FASB ASC 718.

 

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Income Tax/Deferred Tax: FASB ASC 740 requires recognition of deferred tax assets and liabilities for the expected future tax consequences of events that have been included in the financial statements or tax returns. Under this method, deferred tax assets and liabilities are determined based on differing treatment of items for financial reporting and income tax reporting purposes. The deferred tax balances are adjusted to reflect tax rates by tax jurisdiction, based on currently enacted tax laws, which will be in effect in the years in which the temporary differences are expected to reverse. Under FASB ASC 740, the effect on deferred tax assets and liabilities of a change in tax rates is recognized in income in the period that includes the enactment date. A valuation allowance is provided for certain deferred tax assets if it is more likely than not that Optex Systems Holdings will not realize tax assets through future operations. Optex Systems Holdings has recognized deferred income tax benefits on net operating loss carry-forwards to the extent Optex Systems Holdings believes it will be able to utilize them in future tax filings. The difference between the income tax expense and pretax accounting income is primarily attributable non-deductible expenses representing permanent timing differences between book income and taxable income during the twelve months ended September 29, 2013 of ($6) thousand.

 

Earnings per Share: Basic earnings per share is computed by dividing income available for common shareholders (the numerator) by the weighted average number of common shares outstanding (the denominator) for the period. Diluted earnings per share reflect the potential dilution that could occur if securities or other contracts to issue common stock were exercised or converted into common stock.

 

The potentially dilutive securities that Optex Systems Holdings has outstanding are convertible preferred stock, stock options and warrants. In computing the dilutive effect of convertible preferred stock, the numerator is adjusted to add back any convertible preferred dividends, and the denominator is increased to assume the conversion of the number of additional common shares. Optex Systems Holdings uses the Treasury Stock Method to compute the dilutive effect of stock options and warrants. Convertible preferred stock, stock options and warrants that are anti-dilutive are excluded from the calculation of diluted earnings per common share.

 

For the twelve months ended September 29, 2013, 1,016 shares of Series A preferred stock, 48,247,649 stock options and 4,547,000 warrants were included as potentially dilutive. For the twelve months ended September 30, 2012, 1,023 shares of Series A preferred stock, 48,477,649 stock options and 4,547,000 warrants were excluded as anti-dilutive due to the net loss attributable to common shareholders during the year.

 

Note 3 - Recent Accounting Pronouncements

 

In July 2013, FASB issued ASU 2013-11—Income Taxes (ASC Topic 740): “Presentation of an Unrecognized Tax Benefit When a Net Operating Loss Carryforward, a Similar Tax Loss, or a Tax Credit Carryforward Exists (a consensus of the FASB Emerging Issues Task Force)”. The amendments in this update provide explicit guidance on the financial statement presentation of an unrecognized tax benefit when a net operating loss carryforward, a similar tax loss, or a tax credit carryforward exists at the reporting date. The update is effective for fiscal years, and interim periods within those years, beginning after December 15, 2013. As such, Optex Systems Holdings is required to adopt these provisions at the beginning of the interim period ending March 30, 2014. Optex Systems Holdings is currently evaluating the impact of FASB ASU 2013-11 but does not expect the adoption thereof to have a material effect on Optex Systems Holdings’ financial statements.

 

In April 2011, FASB issued ASC 820 “Amendments to Achieve Common Fair Value Measurement and Disclosure Requirements in U.S. GAAP and IFRSs” which describe and clarify many of the requirements in U.S. GAAP for measuring fair value and for disclosing information about fair value. The amendments in this update result in common fair value measurement and disclosure requirements in U.S. GAAP and IFRS. FASB ASC 820 is effective for financial statements of public entities that are issued for fiscal years and interim periods beginning after December 15, 2011. As such, Optex Systems Holdings adopted these provisions at the beginning of the interim period ending April 1, 2012.  Adoption of FASB ASC 820 did not have a material effect on Optex Systems Holding’s financial statements.

 

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Note 4 - Property and Equipment

 

A summary of property and equipment at September 29, 2013 and September 30, 2012 is as follows:

 

      (Thousands) 
   Estimated Useful Life  Year Ended
September 29, 2013
   Year Ended
September 30, 2012
 
Property and Equipment             
Furniture and Equipment  3-5yrs  $257   $253 
Machinery and Equipment  5 yrs   1,171    1,077 
Leasehold Improvements  7 yrs   276    254 
Less: Accumulated Depreciation      (1,460)   (1,392)
Net Property & Equipment     $244   $192 
              
Depreciation Expense     $69   $165 

 

Depreciation expense included in cost of goods sold and general and administrative expense for fiscal 2013 is $19 thousand and $50 thousand, respectively. Depreciation expense included in cost of goods sold and general and administrative expense for fiscal 2012 is $106 thousand and $59 thousand, respectively and included $101 thousand of additional depreciation expense related to changes in net book values and estimated remaining lives.

 

Note 5 – Accrued Liabilities

 

The components of accrued liabilities for the years ended September 29, 2013 and September 30, 2012 are summarized below:

 

   (Thousands) 
   Year Ended
September 29,
2013
   Year Ended
September 30,
2012
 
         
Deferred Rent Expense  $44   $68 
Accrued Vacation   199    174 
Property Taxes   29    27 
Franchise Taxes       7 
Operating Expenses   305    339 
Payroll & Payroll Related   129    139 
Total Accrued Expenses  $706   $754 

 

Note 6 - Commitments and Contingencies

 

Leases

 

Pursuant to a lease amendment effective January 4, 2010, Optex Systems Holdings leases its office and manufacturing facilities under a non-cancellable operating lease expiring July 31, 2015. See Note 14 - Subsequent events. There are several non-cancellable operating leases for office and manufacturing equipment.   Total expenses under facility lease agreements for the fiscal year ended September 29, 2013 was $312 thousand and included $13 thousand related to a six month short term lease expiring in January 2014.  Total expenses for manufacturing and office equipment for the year ended September 29, 2013 was $18 thousand.  Total expenses under facility lease agreements for the fiscal year ended September 30, 2012 was $285 thousand and total expenses for manufacturing and office equipment was $13 thousand.

 

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At September 29, 2013, the remaining minimum lease payments under the non-cancelable operating leases for equipment, office and facility space were as follows:

 

   Operating
Leases
(Thousands)
 
Fiscal Year     
2014  $277 
2015   212 
      
Total minimum lease payments  $489 

 

Pursuant to the terms of the amendment to the facilities lease, there was no base rent payment due from January 1, 2010 through July 31, 2010, and the total value of this rent abatement was $134 thousand.  The value of the deferred rent expense has been amortized monthly at a rate of $2 thousand per month over the life of the lease.  The total unamortized deferred rent as of September 29, 2013 was $44 thousand.  Commencing on August 1, 2010, the base rent payment was $19 thousand per month and increased to $20 thousand per month on August 1, 2013 through the end of the lease on July 30, 2015. 

 

As described further in Note 14 – Subsequent Events, on December 10, 2013, the company executed a lease extension on its Richardson, TX lease through March 2021.

 

Note 7 - Transactions with a Related Party

 

There were no transactions with Related Parties during fiscal years 2013 or 2012 except as described below in Note 8 Debt Financing.

 

Note 8 - Debt Financing

 

Related Parties

 

Acquisition by Sileas Corporation on February 20, 2009

 

On February 20, 2009, Sileas purchased 100% of the equity and debt interest held by Longview, representing 90% of Optex Systems, Inc. (Delaware).  Currently, Sileas is the majority owner of Optex Systems Holdings.

 

Secured Promissory Note Due February 20, 2014/Longview Fund, LP

 

As a result of the transaction described above between Sileas and Longview Fund, LP on February 20, 2009, Sileas, currently majority owner of Optex Systems Holdings, executed and delivered to Longview, a Secured Promissory Note, originally due February 20, 2012 in the principal amount of $13.5 million. The note was extended on November 22, 2011 until February 20, 2014 in exchange for and extension fee of $270 thousand. The note balance as of September 29, 2013 was $13.8 million. See also, Note 14 – Subsequent events.

 

The Note bears simple interest at the rate of 4% per annum, and the interest rate upon an event of default increases to 10% per annum. The obligations of Sileas under the note are secured by a security interest in Optex Systems Holdings’ common and preferred stock owned by Sileas. Optex Systems Holdings has not guaranteed the note and Longview is not entitled to pursue Optex Systems Holdings in the event of a default by Sileas. Therefore, there are no actual or potential cash flow commitments from Optex Systems Holdings. In the event of default by Sileas on its obligations under the note, Longview would only be entitled to receive the Optex Systems Holdings common and preferred stock held by Sileas.

 

Credit Facility – Avidbank (formerly known as Peninsula Bank Business Funding)

 

On March 22, 2011, Optex Systems Holdings, Inc. amended its revolving credit facility with Avidbank, which provided up to $1 million in financing against eligible receivables. The line expired on March 15, 2012. Subsequently, in April 2012, the Company amended its revolving credit facility with Avidbank. The new renewable revolving maturity date is July 15, 2014. The facility provides up to $1 million in financing against eligible receivables for up to two years. The material terms of the amended revolving credit facility are as follows:

 

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The interest rate for all advances shall be the greater of 7.0% and the then in effect prime rate plus 3.5% (3.25% at September 29, 2013). The additional minimum interest payment requirement has been eliminated.

 

Interest shall be paid monthly in arrears.

 

The loan period is from July 15th through July 14th of the following year, beginning with the period of July 15, 2012 through July 14, 2013 and a revolving loan maturity date of July 14, 2014, at which time any outstanding advances, and accrued and unpaid interest thereon, will be due and payable.

 

A renewal fee of $10,000 is due on the 15th day of April each year beginning with April 15, 2012.

 

The obligations of Optex Systems, Inc. to Avidbank are secured by a first lien on all of its assets (including intellectual property assets should it have any in the future) in favor of Avidbank.

 

The facility contains customary events of default. Upon the occurrence of an event of default that remains uncured after any applicable cure period, Avidbank’s commitment to make further advances may terminate, and Avidbank would also be entitled to pursue other remedies against Optex Systems, Inc. and the pledged collateral.

 

Pursuant to a guaranty executed by Optex Systems Holdings in favor of Avidbank, Optex Systems Holdings has guaranteed all obligations of Optex Systems, Inc. to Avidbank.

 

The facility contains a requirement for the Company to maintain a zero balance on the revolving line for a period of at least 30 consecutive days during each loan period.

 

As of September 29, 2013, the outstanding balance on the line of credit was $858 thousand.  For the years ended September 29, 2013 and September 30, 2012, the total interest expense against the outstanding line of credit balance was $42 thousand and $19 thousand, respectively. 

 

Note 10-Stock Based Compensation

 

On March 26, 2009, the Board of Directors adopted the 2009 Stock Option Plan providing for the issuance of up to 6,000,000 shares to Optex Systems Holdings officers, directors, employees and to independent contractors who provide services to Optex Systems Holdings.  

 

Options granted under the 2009 Stock Option Plan vest as determined by the Board of Directors of Optex Systems Holdings or a committee set up to act as a compensation committee of the Board of Directors and terminate after the earliest of the following events: (i) expiration of the option as provided in the option agreement, (ii) 90 days following the date of termination of the employee, or (iii) ten years from the date of grant (five years from the date of grant for incentive options granted to an employee who owns more than 10% of the total combined voting power of all classes of Optex Systems Holdings stock at the date of grant).  In some instances, granted stock options are immediately exercisable into restricted shares of common stock, which vest in accordance with the original terms of the related options. Optex Systems Holdings recognizes compensation expense ratably over the requisite service period.

 

The option price of each share of common stock is determined by the Board of Directors or a committee set up to act as a compensation committee, provided that with respect to incentive stock options, the option price per share will in all cases be equal to or greater than 100% of the fair value of a share of common stock on the date of the grant, except an incentive option granted under the 2009 Stock Option Plan to a shareholder that owns more than 10% of the total combined voting power of all classes of Optex Systems Holdings’ stock, will have an exercise price of not less than 110% of the fair value of a share of common stock on the date of grant. No participant may be granted incentive stock options, which would result in shares with an aggregate fair value of more than $100,000 first becoming exercisable in one calendar year.

 

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Optex Systems Holdings adopted its 2009 Stock Option Plan on March 26, 2009.  On December 9, 2011, Optex Systems Holdings Board of Directors authorized an amendment to its Stock Option Plan to increase the number of issuable shares from 6,000,000 to 50,000,000 and authorized the grant of 10,000,000 options in the aggregate to two board members and a total of 36,070,000 to Optex Systems Holdings employees including 20,000,000 options to executive officers, at an exercise price of $0.01per share with each grant to vest 25% per year over four years for each year with which the grantee is still employed by or serving as a director of Optex Systems Holdings (with all unvested options automatically expiring on the date of termination of employment by or service as a director of Optex Systems Holdings) and all unvested options immediately vesting upon a change of control due to a merger or acquisition of Optex Systems Holdings, with the options to be issued within 60 days of December 9, 2011. For shares granted as of December 9, 2011, Optex Systems Holdings anticipates an annualized employee turnover rate of 3% per year, and as such anticipates that only 42,716,864 of the 46,070,000 shares will vest as of the end of the contract term.

 

As of September 29, 2013, 17,700,149 of awarded stock options had vested and 504,000 shares had been forfeited due to employee turnover. As of September 30, 2012, 2,241,899 of the awarded stock options had vested and 274,000 shares had been forfeited due to employee turnover. The vested options as of September 29, 2013 include 3,750,000 shares that were vested early as a result a board resolution on January 3, 2013 regarding the resignation of Ronald Richards, which was effective December 31, 2012. The total vested options for Ronald Richards of 5,000,000 shares were extended to expire on December 31, 2014.

 

Optex Systems Holdings recorded compensation costs for options and shares granted under the plan amounting to $128 thousand and $152 thousand for the fiscal years ended September 29, 2013 and September 30, 2012, respectively and was charged as general and administrative compensation expense for each of the respective fiscal years. A deduction is not allowed for income tax purposes until nonqualified options are exercised. The amount of this deduction will be the difference between the fair value of Optex Systems Holdings’ common stock and the exercise price at the date of exercise. For the year ended September 29, 2013, estimated deferred tax assets related to option compensation costs were $43 thousand and have been recorded for the tax effect of the financial statement expense.  For the year ended September 30, 2012 the estimated deferred tax assets related to option compensation costs were $52 thousand and have been recorded for the tax effect of the financial statement expense.  No tax deduction is allowed for incentive stock options. Accordingly no deferred tax asset is recorded for GAAP expense related to these options.

  

Optex Systems Holdings records its stock based compensation expense in accordance with ASC 718-10, “Compensation – Stock Compensation”. In estimating the value of stock options issued, management has valued the options at their date of grant utilizing the Black-Scholes-Merton option pricing model.  For options issued on December 9, 2011, the fair value of the underlying shares was determined based on the closing price of Optex Systems Holdings’ publicly-traded shares as of December 9, 2011.  Further, Optex used an expected volatility of 364.2% which was calculated using the historical Optex Systems Holdings stock prices over the prior 12 month trading period. Estimation of these equity instruments’ fair value is affected by our stock price, as well as assumptions regarding subjective and complex variables such as employee exercise behavior and our expected stock price volatility over the term of the award. As our assumptions are based on historical information, judgment is required to determine if historical trends are fair indicators of future outcomes.

 

The risk-free interest rates used of 1.5% to 2.2% were determined based on the implied yield available on U.S. Treasury issues with an equivalent term approximating the expected life of the options of 4.5 to 7 years depending on the date of the grant and expected life of the options.  The expected life of options used was based on the contractual life of the option grant.  Optex Systems Holdings determined the expected dividend rate based on the assumption and expectation that earnings generated from operations are not expected to be adequate to allow for the payment of dividends in the near future and the assumption that Optex Systems Holdings does not presently have any intention of paying cash dividends on its common stock. 

 

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Optex Systems Holdings has granted stock options to officers and employees as follows:

 

Date of  Shares   Exercise   Shares Outstanding   Expiration   Vesting 
Grant  Granted   Price   As of 09/29/13   Date   Date 
                     
03/30/09   480,981   $0.15    480,981    03/29/2016    03/30/2010 
03/30/09   466,834   $0.15    466,834    03/29/2016    03/30/2011 
03/30/09   466,834   $0.15    466,834    03/29/2016    03/30/2012 
05/14/09   316,750   $0.15    275,750    05/13/2016    05/14/2010 
05/14/09   316,750   $0.15    275,750    05/13/2016    05/14/2011 
05/14/09   316,750   $0.15    275,750    05/13/2016    05/14/2012 
05/14/09   316,750   $0.15    275,750    05/13/2016    05/14/2013 
12/09/11   11,517,500   $0.01    11,432,500    12/08/2018    12/08/2012 
12/09/11   11,517,500   $0.01    11,432,500    12/08/2018    12/08/2013 
12/09/11   11,517,500   $0.01    11,432,500    12/08/2018    12/08/2014 
12/09/11   11,517,500   $0.01    11,432,500    12/08/2018    12/08/2015 
Total   48,751,649         48,247,649           

 

The following table summarizes the status of Optex Systems Holdings’ aggregate stock options granted under the incentive stock option plan:

 

   Number   Weighted         
   of Shares   Average   Weighted   Aggregate 
   Remaining   Fair   Average   Value 
Subject to Exercise  Options   Value   Life (Years)   (Thousands) 
Outstanding as of October 2, 2011   2,527,649   $    3.38     
Granted – 2012   46,070,000   $0.01    5.94   $322 
Forfeited – 2012   (120,000)  $         
Exercised – 2012      $         
Outstanding as of September 30, 2012   48,477,649   $    4.56     
Granted – 2013      $         
Forfeited – 2013   (230,000)  $         
Exercised – 2013      $         
Outstanding as of September 29, 2013   48,247,649   $    3.56     
                     
Exercisable as of September 30, 2012   2,241,899   $    1.95   $ 
                     
Exercisable as of September 29, 2013   17,700,149   $    2.75   $ 

  

There were no new options granted and zero options exercised during the year ended September 29, 2013.

There were 46,070,000 new options granted and zero options exercised during the year ended September 30, 2012. The total intrinsic value of outstanding options as of September 29, 2013 was $0.

 

The following table summarizes the status of Optex Systems Holdings’ aggregate non-vested shares granted under the 2009 Stock Option Plan:

 

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   Number of 
Non- 
vested 
Shares 
Subject to 
Options
   Weighted- 
Average 
Grant- 
Date 
Fair Value
 
Non-vested as of October 2, 2011   1,023,334   $0.15 
Non-vested granted — year ended September 30, 2012   46,070,000   $0.01 
Vested — year ended September 30, 2012   (737,584)  $0.12 
Forfeited — year ended September 30, 2012   (120,000)  $0.01 
Non-vested as of September 30, 2012   46,235,750   $0.01 
Non-vested granted — year ended September 29, 2013      $ 
Vested — year ended September 29, 2013   (15,458,250)  $0.01 
Forfeited — year ended September 29, 2013   (230,000)  $0.01 
Non-vested as of September 29, 2013   30,547,500   $0.01 

 

As of September 29, 2013, the unrecognized compensation cost for share based compensation arrangements granted under the plan was approximately $144 thousand.  These costs are expected to be recognized on a straight line basis through December 8, 2018. The total fair value of options and shares vested during the year ended September 29, 2013 was $180 thousand. 

 

There were no equity instruments issued to consultants and vendors in fiscal years 2012 and 2013.  

 

Warrant Agreements: Optex Systems Holdings calculates the fair value of warrants issued with debt or preferred stock using the Black-Scholes-Merton valuation method. The total proceeds received in the sale of debt or preferred stock and related warrants are allocated among these financial instruments based on their relative fair values. The discount arising from assigning a portion of the total proceeds to the warrants issued is recognized as interest expense for debt from the date of issuance to the earlier of the maturity date of the debt or the conversion dates using the effective yield method.

 

On July 19, 2012, Optex Systems Holdings, Inc. offered certain holders of the Company’s outstanding warrants, a 30 day temporary reduction in the warrant exercise price to $0.01 per share. The warrants consisted of 8,131,667 warrants of the Company, with an original exercise price of $0.45 per share, issued by the Company in a private placement transaction in March 2009. The temporary reduction in the warrant exercise price to $0.01 per share was determined by the Company in order to provide the holders of the warrants with an incentive to exercise the warrants. During the 30 day temporary reduction, 5,401,667 warrants were exercised for total proceeds of $54 thousand. The offer period expired on August 18, 2012.

 

As of September 29, 2013, Optex Systems Holdings had the following warrants outstanding:

 

   Grant Date  Warrants
Granted
   Exercise
Price
   Outstanding as of
9/29/13
   Expiration
Date
  Term 
Private Placement  Stock Holders  3/30/2009   8,131,667   $0.450    2,730,000   3/29/2014   5 years 
Finder Fee on Private Placement  3/30/2009   717,000   $0.165    717,000   3/29/2014   5 years 
Longview Fund Allonge Agreement  1/5/2010   100,000   $0.150          3 years 
Avidbank- Line of Credit  3/4/2010   1,000,000   $0.100    1,000,000   3/3/2016   6 years 
Total Warrants      9,948,667         4,447,000         

 

There were 100,000 warrants with an exercise price of $0.15 per warrant, granted to the Longview Fund on January 5, 2010 in exchange for an allonge agreement, which expired on January 4, 2013, unexcercised. During the year ended September 29, 2013 and year ended September 30, 2012, Optex Systems Holdings recorded zero interest expense related to the outstanding warrants. Interest expense related to outstanding warrants was fully amortized as of September 30, 2012. 

 

During the periods ended September 29, 2013 and September 30, 2012, Optex Systems Holdings recorded a total of $0 and $0 thousand in interest expense related to the outstanding warrants and has an unamortized interest balance of zero as of September 29, 2013.  These warrants are included in the computation of weighted average of shares for year ended September 29, 2013 as it would be potentially dilutive, but are excluded in the computation of weighted average of shares for year ended September 30, 2012 as it would be anti-dilutive due to the net loss attributable to common shareholders incurred during the year.

 

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Note 11  –  Stockholders Equity

 

Common stock:

 

On February 22, 2012, Alpha Capital Anstalt purchased 5,000,000 restricted shares of Common Stock of Optex Systems Holdings at a purchase price of $0.01 per share, for a total purchase price of $50,000. The purchase price for the Common Stock was negotiated on February 2, 2012 when the stock price was $0.01. The $50,000 has been utilized by Optex Systems Holdings for operating expenses. On August 22, 2012, Alpha Capital Anstalt converted 3.64 preferred shares at a stated value of $6,860 into 2,500,000 shares of common stock at a conversion price of $0.01 per share for a total converted value of $25,000. The Common Stock was purchased or converted by Alpha in private transactions exempt from registration under Section 4(2) of the Securities Act of 1934 and is restricted from resale and the stock certificate issued bears the appropriate restrictive legend. On March 19, 2013, Alpha Capital Anstalt converted 7.29 shares of Series A preferred stock at a stated value of $6,860 into 5,000,000 shares of its Common Stock at a conversion price of $0.01 per share for a total converted value of $50,000. 

 

On June 22, 2011, our shareholders approved an amendment to our articles of incorporation to increase our authorized shares of common stock to 2 billion. This amendment was the subject of a Definitive Information Statement on Scheduled 14C which was filed with the SEC on September 23, 2011 and filed with the Secretary of State of the State of Delaware on November 23, 2011.

 

On July 14, 2011 Optex filed a Registration Statement on Form S-1 which provides for the sale of up to 25,000,000 shares of our common stock at a fixed price (currently anticipated to be $0.01 per share). The S-1 also contemplates a reduction in the warrant exercise price to $0.01 per share for the 2009 private placement investors for 30 days from the date of effectiveness of this registration statement, and a waiver of accrued dividends from the Series A preferred shareholders. This Registration Statement was declared effective on July 19, 2012, and the 30 day reduction in warrant exercise price to $.01 commenced on that date. During the 30 day temporary reduction, 5,401,667 warrants were exercised for total proceeds of $54 thousand. The offer period expired on August 18, 2012. See Note 10, “Warrant Agreements”.

 

There were no new issues of common or preferred stock during the year ended September 29, 2013. During the year ended September 30, 2012, there were no other issues of common or preferred stock.

 

Series A preferred stock

 

Optex Systems Holdings has filed a Certificate of Designation with the Secretary of State of the State of Delaware authorizing a series of preferred stock, under its articles of incorporation, known as “Series A preferred stock”. The Certificate of Designation currently sets forth the following terms for the Series A preferred stock: (i) number of authorized shares: 1,027; (ii) per share stated value: $6,000; (iii) liquidation preference per share: stated value; (iv) conversion price: $0.15 per share as adjusted from time to time; and (v) voting rights: votes along with the common stock on an as converted basis with one vote per share. The conversion price was subsequently reset to $0.01 per share as discussed below.

 

The Series A preferred stock entitles the holders to receive cumulative dividends at the rate of 6% per annum, payable in cash at the discretion of Board of Directors. Each share of preferred stock is immediately convertible into common shares at the option of the holder which entitles the holder to receive the equivalent number of common shares equal to the stated value of the preferred shares divided by the conversion price, which was initially set at $0.15 per share. The dividends were subsequently waived and the price per share was reset to $0.01 on February 21, 2012 as discussed below.

 

Holders of preferred shares receive preferential rights in the event of liquidation. Additionally the preferred stock shareholders are entitled to vote together with the common stock on an “as-converted” basis.

 

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As of July 3, 2011, the preferred shareholders agreed to waive the past dividends in arrears through July 3, 2011 of $884 thousand, in exchange for an increase in the stated value to $6,860. On February 21, 2012, in connection with the purchase of the 5,000,000 shares of common stock of Optex Systems Holdings by Alpha Capital, the preferred shareholders executed an irrevocable waiver for any and all previously accrued and outstanding dividends and the right to receive any future dividends on the Series A Preferred Stock. The per share conversion price of the Optex Systems Holdings’ Series A Preferred Stock has been automatically reset to $0.01 per share in accordance with the reset provision as set forth in paragraph 4(d)(ii) of the Series Designation for the Optex Systems Holdings’ Series A Preferred Stock. The total amount of dividends waived as a result of the February 21, 2012 waiver is $213 thousand.

 

As of September 29, 2013, there were no dividends in arrears on preferred shares and no future dividends will accrue on the preferred shares. As of the year ended September 30, 2012 and as a result of the executed waiver dated February 21, 2012, there were no recorded preferred dividends payable and Optex Systems Holdings reversed the previously recorded preferred dividends payable of $106 thousand.

 

On August 22, 2012, Alpha Capital Anstalt converted 3.64 preferred shares into 2,500,000 shares of common stock. On March 19, 2013, Alpha Capital Anstalt converted 7.29 shares of Series A preferred stock into 5,000,000 shares of common stock. 

  

Note 12 - Income Taxes

 

The income tax provisions as of September 29, 2013 and September 30, 2012 include the following:

 

   (Thousands) 
   2013   2012 
Current income tax expense:          
Federal  $   $ 
State          
   $   $ 
Deferred income tax provision (benefit):          
Federal  $80   $(105)
State          
Change in valuation allowance       153 
           
Provision for (Benefit from) income taxes, net  $80   $48 

 

The income tax provision for Optex Systems as of September 29, 2013 differs from those computed using the statutory federal tax rate of 34%, due to the following permanent differences:

 

   2013   %   2012   % 
                 
Tax provision (benefit) at statutory federal rate  $74    34%  $(109)   (34)%
Nondeductible expenses   6    3%       0%
Change in valuation and other           157    49%
 Provision for (Benefit from) income taxes, net  $80    37%  $48    15%

 

Deferred income taxes recorded in the balance sheets results from differences between financial statement and tax reporting of income and deductions.  A summary of the composition of the deferred income tax assets (liabilities) follows:

 

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   (Thousands) 
   Deferred Tax Asset - Long Term 
   As of 
September 29,
2013
   As of 
September 30,
2012
 
         
Stock Options  $171   $128 
Inventory Reserve   189    139 
Unicap   50    47 
Contract Loss Reserve   (279)   (279)
Fixed assets   27    26 
Goodwill Amortization   1,773    1,934 
Intangible Asset Amortization   915    1,007 
Net Operating Losses   917    848 
Other   (47)   (54)
Subtotal  $3,716   $3,796 
Valuation allowance   (2,639)   (2,639)
Net deferred asset (liability)-long term  $1,077   $1,157 

 

As of September 29, 2013, the Company has a net operating loss of approximately $2,698 thousand as compared to a net loss carryforwards of $2,494 thousand available as of September 30, 2012.

 

As the result of the application of the FASB ASC 740-10, Optex Systems Holdings has no unrecognized tax benefits. By statute, the tax years ending in September 29, 2013, September 30, 2012 and October 2, 2011 are open to examination by the major taxing jurisdictions to which the Optex Systems Holdings is subject.

 

There were no income taxes paid the fiscal year ended September 29, 2013, and there were no income taxes paid the fiscal year ended September 30, 2012. 

 

Note 13 — Defined Contribution Plan

 

The Company sponsors a defined contribution pension plan under Section 401(k) of the Internal Revenue Code for all employees.  Company contributions are voluntary and are determined annually at the discretion of the Board of Directors at the beginning of each fiscal year. For the fiscal year ending September 29, 2013, the company offered a qualified automatic contribution arrangement (QACA) with a 100% match of the first 1% and 50% matching of the next 5% and a 2 year vesting requirement. For the fiscal year ending September 30, 2012, effective as of January 1, 2012, the company offered a qualified automatic contribution arrangement (QACA) with a 100% match of the first 1% and 50% matching of the next 5% and a 2 year vesting requirement. The Company’s contribution expense for the fiscal years ended September 29, 2013 and September 30, 2012 $74 thousand and $56 thousand, respectively.

 

Note 14 — Subsequent Events

 

·On November 27, 2013, the Company was notified that Sileas Corp. and the Longview Fund, LP entered into an amendment to the Secured Promissory Note that extended the maturity date for an additional two year period ending on February 20, 2016. In exchange for the extension, Sileas Corp. agreed to pay the Longview Fund an extension fee equal to 2% of the principal amount of this Secured Note. As a result of the amendment, the principal amount of the Note was increased by $275 thousand to $14.1 million as of November 27, 2013, 2013.  
·On December 10, 2013 Optex Systems Holdings executed a lease amendment, renewing its Richardson, TX lease, effective as of December 10, 2013. Under the terms of the amendment:
oThe lease term is extended until March 31, 2021.
oThe annual base rent rate is as follows: from 1/1/14 -3/31/14, $0.00 per square foot; from 4/1/2010 – 3/31/2018, $5.45 per square foot; from 4/1/2018 – 3/31/2019, $5.65 per square foot; from 4/1/2019 – 3/31/2020, $5.85 per square foot; and from 4/1/2020 – 3/31/2021, $6.05 per square foot.
oA $0.35 million HVAC improvement allowance is included.

·On December 19, 2013 , the Board of Directors of Optex Systems Holdings, Inc. authorized an amendment to its Stock Option Plan to increase the number of issuable shares from 50,000,000 to 75,000,000 and authorized the grant of 20,000,000 options to three board members and a grant of 5,000,000 to an Optex Systems Holdings officer. The options have an exercise price of $0.01 per share with each grant to vest 25% per year over four years for each year with which the grantee is still employed by or serving as a director of Optex Systems Holdings, Inc. (with all unvested options automatically expiring on the date of termination of employment by or service as a director of Optex Systems Holdings, Inc.) and all unvested options immediately vesting upon a change of control due to a merger or acquisition of the Company.

 

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Item 9.Changes in and Disagreements With Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure.

 

Resignation of Current Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm

 

On August 28, 2013, Optex Systems Holdings, Inc., a Delaware corporation (“Company”) dismissed EFP Rotenberg, LLP (“EFPR”) as its independent registered public accounting firm. The decision to dismiss EFPR was made by the Company’s Board of Directors on August 28, 2013, due to the fact that the Company does not currently have an Audit Committee.

EFPR’s reports on our financial statements for the years ended October 2, 2011 and September 30, 2012 did not contain an adverse opinion or a disclaimer of opinion, nor were they qualified or modified as to uncertainty, audit scope, or accounting principles. During our two most recent fiscal years ended October 2, 2011 and September 30, 2012 and through August 28, 2013, the date of EFPR’s dismissal, we had no disagreements (as defined in Item 304 of Regulation S-K) with EFPR on any matter of accounting principles or practices, financial statement disclosure, or auditing scope or procedure, which disagreements, if not resolved to EFPR’s satisfaction, would have caused it to make reference to the subject matter of the disagreements in connection any opinion to the subject matter of the disagreement. Furthermore, during the period of EFPR’s retention, there were no reportable events of the type described in Item 304(a)(1)(v) of Regulation S-K.

We provided EFPR with a copy of the disclosures made in the current report on Form 8-K (the “Report”) filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on August 29, 2013. EFPR furnished a letter addressed to the Securities and Exchange Commission stating whether it agreed with our statements made in the Report..

Engagement of PMB Helin Donovan, LLP

On August 28, 2013, our Board of Directors engaged PMB Helin Donovan, LLP (“PMB”), which is an independent registered public accounting firm registered with, and governed by the rules of, the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board, as our independent registered public accounting firm. During the two most recent fiscal years, and through August 28, 2013, neither the Company nor anyone on our behalf consulted PMB regarding either (i) the application of accounting principles to a specified transaction regarding the Company, either proposed or completed, or the type of audit opinion that might be rendered on the Company’s financial statements, and neither a written report nor oral advice was provided to the Company that was an important factor considered by the Company in reaching a decision as to the accounting, auditing or financial reporting issue; or (ii) any matter that was the subject of a disagreement (as that term is defined in Item 304(a)(1)(iv) of Regulation S-K and the related instructions) or a “reportable event” (as that term is defined in Item 304(a)(1)(v) of Regulation S-K).

Item 9A.Controls and Procedures

 

Evaluation of Disclosure Controls and Procedures

 

As of September 29, 2013, management performed, with the participation of our Principal Executive Officer and Principal Financial Officer, an evaluation of the effectiveness of our disclosure controls and procedures as defined in Rules 13a-15(e) and 15d-15(e) of the Exchange Act. Our disclosure controls and procedures are designed to ensure that information required to be disclosed in the report we file or submit under the Exchange Act is recorded, processed, summarized, and reported within the time periods specified in the SEC’s forms, and that such information is accumulated and communicated to our management including our Principal Executive Officer and our Principal Financial Officer, to allow timely decisions regarding required disclosures. Based on the evaluation, our Principal Executive Officer and our Principal Financial Officer concluded that, as of September 29, 2013, our disclosure controls and procedures were effective.

 

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Management’s Report on Internal Control Over Financial Reporting

 

Management is responsible for establishing and maintaining adequate internal control over financial reporting, as defined in Rules 13a-15(f) and 15d-15(f) of the Exchange Act. Internal control over financial reporting is a process designed to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements in accordance with GAAP. Because of its inherent limitations, internal control over financial reporting may not prevent or detect misstatements. Also, projection of any evaluation of effectiveness to future periods is subject to the risk that controls may become inadequate because of changes in conditions, or that the degree of compliance with the policies or procedures may deteriorate.

 

Management has conducted, with the participation of our Principal Executive Officer and our Principal Financial Officer, an assessment, including testing of the effectiveness, of our internal control over financial reporting as of September 29, 2013. Management’s assessment of internal control over financial reporting was conducted using the criteria in Internal Control over Financial Reporting - Guidance for Smaller Public Companies issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission. 

 

A material weakness is a deficiency, or a combination of deficiencies, in internal control over financial reporting, such that there is a reasonable possibility that a material misstatement of our annual or interim financial statements will not be prevented or detected on a timely basis. In connection with our management’s assessment of our internal control over financial reporting as required under Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, we have not identified any material weaknesses in our internal control over financial reporting as of September 29, 2013.  We have thus concluded that our internal control over financial reporting was effective as of September 29, 2013.

 

PART III

 

Item 10  Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance

 

MANAGEMENT

 

Our board of directors directs the management of the business and affairs of our company as provided in our certificate of incorporation, our by-laws and the General Corporation Law of Delaware. Members of our board of directors keep informed about our business through discussions with senior management, by reviewing analyses and reports sent to them, and by participating in board and committee meetings.

 

Our Company is led by Danny Schoening, who has served as COO since 2009 and was appointed CEO in 2013, and by Merrick Okamoto who has served on our Board since 2009 and was appointed Chairman in 2013. Our board of directors consists of three directors. The board has an inactive audit committee, as further discussed below, and has no other committees due to its small size.

 

Our board leadership structure is used by other smaller public companies in the United States, and we believe that this leadership structure is effective for us. We believe that having a separate President (principal executive officer) and Chairman is the correct form of leadership for Optex Systems Holdings. We believe that due to our small size bifurcating the leadership role provides for a second point of view and oversight rather than consolidating the role in one individual, who is also tasked with the day to day affairs of Optex Systems Holdings. We believe that our directors provide effective oversight of the risk management function, especially through dialogue between the full board and our management.

 

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We do not currently consider diversity in identifying nominees for director. Due to our small size, the priority has been in attracting qualified directors, and issues such as diversity have not yet been considered.

 

Directors and Executive Officers

 

The following table sets forth information regarding the members of our board of directors and our executive officers and other significant employees. All of our current officers and directors were appointed on March 30, 2009, the closing date of the reorganization.

 

The following table sets forth certain information with respect to the directors and executive officers of Optex Systems Holdings:

 

Name   Age   Position
         
Stanley A. Hirschman   67   President, Secretary, Treasurer & Director
         
Merrick D. Okamoto   53   Chairman of the Board and Director
         
Danny Schoening   49   Chief Executive Officer, Chief Operating Officer and Director
         
Karen L. Hawkins   48   Vice President of Finance and Controller

 

Stanley A. Hirschman. Mr. Hirschman served as a Director and President of Optex Systems, Inc. (Delaware) since September 28, 2008 and assumed the same roles on behalf of Optex Systems Holdings on March 30, 2009, in which roles he is committed to providing Optex his management experience and provides direction and oversight of other executive officers and management. From 1997 to 2009, he was president of CPointe Associates, Inc., a Plano, Texas consulting group, and provided consulting and governance services to small public companies. Since February 2009 he has been the majority beneficial owner of Sileas Corp, the majority shareholder of Optex Systems Holdings. During the past five years, Mr. Hirschman has also sat on the Board of Directors of Axion Power International, Inc., Datascension, Inc. and South Texas Oil. Prior to establishing CPointe Associates, he was Vice President Operations, Software Etc., Inc., a 396 retail software store chain, from 1989 until 1996. He has also held executive positions with T.J. Maxx, Gap Stores and Banana Republic. Mr. Hirschman is a member of the National Association of Corporate Directors, regularly participates in the KMPG Audit Committee Institute and is a graduate of the Harvard Business School Audit Committees in the New Era of Governance symposium. He is active in community affairs and serves on the Advisory Board of the Salvation Army Adult Rehabilitation Centers.

 

Merrick D. Okamoto. Mr. Okamoto served as a Director of Optex Systems, Inc. (Delaware) since October 2008 and has served as a Director of Optex Systems Holdings since March 30, 2009 and was appointed Chairman in 2013. In 2001, Mr. Okamoto co-founded Viking Asset Management, LLC and is the President and a Managing Member. Viking Asset Management is the investment advisor to Longview Fund, LP and Longview Fund International, Ltd. Limited partners in Viking’s family of funds are comprised of institutions, private banks, family offices and high net worth individuals from around the world. Mr. Okamoto has completed financings for hundreds of public and private companies across a broad array of industries and sectors. In 1998, Mr. Okamoto co-founded and was the President of TradePortal.com, Inc. TradePortal.com, Inc. is a software development company and its wholly owned subsidiary, TradePortal Securities, Inc., a direct access execution brokerage firm. Mr. Okamoto was instrumental in developing the proprietary Trade Matrix™ software platform. In 2000, TradePortal.com, Inc. sold a minority stake to Thomson Reuters (TRI:NYSE), a US $12 billion revenue company. In 1995, he founded First Stage Capital, Inc. which specializes in consulting to public and private companies. From 1983 to 1994, he was employed in the securities industry with Shearson Lehman Brothers, Prudential Securities and Paine Webber. Mr. Okamoto is widely recognized as an advanced trader specializing in short-term trading and has more than 25 years of extensive experience in technical market analysis techniques and has been a frequent speaker at national trading venues. From 1987 to 1990, he created and hosted the television program, The Income Report in Los Angeles. He has also appeared on CNN and The MacNeil-Lehrer Report.

 

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Danny Schoening. Mr. Schoening joined Optex Systems, Inc. (Texas) in January 2008. Upon the acquisition of the assets of Optex Systems, Inc. (Texas) by Optex Systems, Inc. (Delaware), Mr. Schoening became the COO of Optex Systems, Inc. (Delaware) (as of September 28, 2008) and he commenced service with Optex Systems Holdings as its Chief Operating Officer as of the date of the reorganization, March 30, 2009 and was appointed Chief Executive Officer and as a Director in 2013. He has been instrumental in establishing the systems and infrastructure required to continue Optex System’s rapid growth. This activity was rewarded with Optex System’s recent ISO9001:2000 Certification. From February 2004 to January 2008, Danny was the Vice President of Operations for The Finisar Corporation AOC Division for 4 years where he led a team of up to 200 employees to produce vertical cavity lasers for the data communications industry at production rates of hundreds of thousands of units per week. Prior to Finisar, Danny was the Director of Operations for multiple divisions of Honeywell International. Serving the Automotive, Medical, Aerospace, and Consumer Commercial Markets. During this 17 year period, Danny was recognized with Honeywell’s Lund Award, their highest award for developing employee resources. Danny has a broad experience level in the following technologies: Mechanical Assembly Processes, Micro-Electronic Assembly Processes, Laser Manufacturing, Plastic Molding, Metal Machining, Plating, Thick Film Printing, Surface Mount Technology, Hall Effect Technology and MEMS based Pressure Devices. Danny received a Bachelors of Science in Manufacturing Engineering Technology from the University of Nebraska, an MBA from Southern Methodist University, and holds three U.S. patents.

 

Karen L. Hawkins. Ms. Hawkins has served Optex Systems Holdings as its Vice President, Finance and Controller, since the date of the reorganization, March 30, 2009 and was the controller of Optex Systems, Inc. (Delaware), effective September 28, 2009. She began her employment with Optex Systems, Inc. (Texas) in April 2007. Ms. Hawkins became a Certified Public Accountant in 1992 and has over 25 years’ experience in Financial Accounting and Management, primarily focused in the Defense and Transportation Industries. She has a strong background in both Financial & Cost Accounting, with extensive Government Pricing, Financial Analysis, and Internal Auditing experience. Her past history also includes Program Management, Materials Management and Business Development. She brings over 18 years direct experience in Government Contracting with a strong knowledge of Cost Accounting Standards Board and Federal Acquisition Regulation. Her previous employment includes General Dynamics – Ordinance and Tactical Division, Garland (formerly known as Intercontinental Manufacturing) for over 13 years from November, 1994 through March , 2007. During her tenure there she served in the roles of Controller (Accounting & IT), Program Manager over a $250M 3 year Army Indefinite Delivery/Indefinite Quantity (Indefinite Delivery/Indefinite Quantity) type contract, as well as Materials Manager with oversight of Purchasing, Production Control & Warehousing functions. Prior to her employment at General Dynamics, Ms. Hawkins served in various finance and accounting positions at Luminator, a Mark IV Industries Co, and Johnson Controls, Battery Division - Garland. Karen received her Bachelor’s Degree in Business Administration in Accounting from Stephen F. Austin State University in Texas in 1986.

 

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Family Relationships

 

There are no family relationships among the officers and directors.

 

Presiding Director

 

Our Chairman, Merrick Okamoto, acts as the presiding director at meetings of our board of directors. In the event that Mr. Okamoto is unavailable to serve at a particular meeting, responsibility for the presiding director function will rotate among the directors in attendance.

 

Corporate Governance

 

Our board of directors believes that sound governance practices and policies provide an important framework to assist them in fulfilling their duty to stockholders. Our board of directors actively supports management’s adoption and implementation of many “best practices” in the area of corporate governance, including annual review of internal control changes, compensation practices, executive management and auditor retention. In 2013 all directors attended a minimum of 75% of the meetings of the board of directors.

 

Code of Ethics

 

Our board of directors has adopted a Code of Ethics which has been distributed to all directors, and executive officers, and will be distributed to employees and will be given to new employees at the time of hire. The Financial Code of Ethics contains a number of provisions that apply principally to our Principal Executive Officer, Principal Financial Officer and other key accounting and financial personnel. A copy of our Code of Business Conduct and Ethics can be found under the “Investor Relations” section of our website (www.optexsys.com) under the section for corporate governance. We also intend to disclose any amendments or waivers of our Code on our website.

 

Board Meetings

 

We are incorporated under the laws of the State of Delaware. The interests of our stockholders are represented by the board of directors, which oversees our business and management.

 

The board of directors meets regularly during the year and holds special meetings and acts by unanimous written consent whenever circumstances require. The board held two meetings (including special meetings) and took action by unanimous written consent zero times during our fiscal year ended September 29, 2013.

 

Board Committees

 

At this time, the board of directors currently has an inactive audit committee which did not meet in fiscal year 2013. Should an audit committee be constituted, a charter of that committee will then be presented to the board of directors for approval..

 

Board nominations

 

Stockholders wishing to bring a nomination for a director candidate before a stockholders meeting must give written notice to our Corporate Secretary, either by personal delivery or by United States mail, postage prepaid. The stockholder’s notice must be received by the Corporate Secretary not later than (a) with respect to an Annual Meeting of Stockholders, 90 days prior to the anniversary date of the immediately preceding annual meeting, and (b) with respect to a special meeting of stockholders for the election of directors, the close of business on the tenth day following the date on which notice of the meeting is first given to stockholders. The stockholder’s notice must set forth all information relating to each person whom the stockholder proposes to nominate that is required to be disclosed under applicable rules and regulations of the SEC, including the written consent of the person proposed to be nominated to being named in the proxy statement as a nominee and to serving as a director if elected. The stockholder’s notice must also set forth as to the stockholder making the nomination (i) the name and address of the stockholder, (ii) the number of shares held by the stockholder, (iii) a representation that the stockholder is a holder of record of stock of the Optex Systems Holdings, entitled to vote at the meeting and intends to appear in person or by proxy at the meeting to nominate the person named in the notice, and (iv) a description of all arrangements or understandings between the stockholder and each nominee.

 

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Stockholder Communications with the Board of Directors

 

Stockholders may communicate directly with the board of directors or any board member by writing to them at Optex Systems Holdings, Inc., 1420 Presidential Drive, Richardson, TX 75081. The outside of the envelope should prominently indicate that the correspondence is intended for the board of directors or for a specific director. The secretary will forward all such written communications to the director to whom it is addressed or, if no director is specified, to the entire board of directors.

 

Director Attendance at Annual Meetings of Stockholders

 

Directors are encouraged to attend annual meetings, although such attendance is not required.

 

Board Independence

 

Our board of directors has determined that one of our directors would meet the independence requirements of the NYSE MKT, if such standards applied to the Company. In the judgment of the board of directors, none of our directors meet such independence standards. In reaching its conclusions, the board of directors considered all relevant facts and circumstances with respect to any direct or indirect relationships between the Company and each of the directors, including those discussed under the caption “Certain Relationships and Related Transactions” below. Our board of directors determined that any relationships that exist or existed in the past between the Company and each of the independent directors were immaterial on the basis of the information set forth in the above-referenced sections.

 

Director Compensation

 

See table below under “Executive Compensation – Director Compensation.”

 

Item 11  Executive Compensation

 

The board of directors administers our option compensation plan. Our Principal Executive Officer and other members of management regularly discuss our compensation issues with the Board of Directors. Subject to Board review, modification and approval, Mr. Hirschman typically makes recommendations respecting bonuses and equity incentive awards for the other members of the executive management team. The Board establishes all bonus and equity incentive awards for Mr. Hirschman in consultation with other members of the management team.

 

Summary Compensation Table

 

The following table sets forth, for the years indicated, all compensation paid, distributed or accrued for services, including salary and bonus amounts, rendered in all capacities by Optex Systems Holdings’ principal executive officer, principal financial officer and all other executive officers who received or are entitled to receive remuneration in excess of $100,000 during the stated periods. These officers are referred to herein as the “named executive officers.” Except as provided below, none of our executive officers received annual compensation in excess of $100,000 during the last two fiscal years.

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Name and                  Option   All Other     
Principal      Salary   Bonus   Stock   Awards ($)   Compensation   Total 
Position  Year   ($)   ($)   Awards ($)   (1)   ($)   ($) 
Stanley A. Hirschman,   2013    79,334             7,968         87,302 
President   2012   $90,001   $   $   $6,579   $   $96,580 
    2011   $84,836   $225   $   $   $   $85,061 
                                    
Danny Schoening,   2013    218,856             5,115         223,971 
CEO   2012   $232,076   $48,092   $   $23,514   $   $303,682 
    2011    210,184    300       $21,177   $   $231,661 
                                    
Karen Hawkins   2013    160,178    7,839         16,636         184,653 
VP Finance / Controller   2012   $160,609   $34,312   $   $20,602   $   $215,523 
    2011   $149,294   $7,694   $   $12,991   $   $169,979 

 

1The amounts in the “Option awards” column reflect the dollar amounts recognized as the executive portion of compensation expense for financial statement reporting purposes for each named executive officer during fiscal 2011 through fiscal 2013, as required by FASB ASC 718, disregarding any estimates for forfeitures relating to service-based vesting conditions. For the assumptions relating to these valuations, see note 10 to our fiscal 2013 audited financial statements.

 

Option Grants in Last Fiscal Year

 

There were no plan based awards made to our named executive officers during the fiscal year ended September 29, 2013.

 

On December 19, 2013 , the Board of Directors of Optex Systems Holdings, Inc. authorized an amendment to its Stock Option Plan to increase the number of issuable shares from 50,000,000 to 75,000,000 and authorized the grant of 20,000,000 options to three board members and a grant of 5,000,000 to an Optex Systems Holdings officer. The options are exercise prices of $0.01per share with each grant to vest 25% per year over four years for each year with which the grantee is still employed by or serving as a director of Optex Systems Holdings, Inc. (with all unvested options automatically expiring on the date of termination of employment by or service as a director of Optex Systems Holdings, Inc.) and all unvested options immediately vesting upon a change of control due to a merger or acquisition of the Company.

  

Employment Agreement

 

Optex Systems Holdings entered into an employment agreement with Danny Schoening dated December 1, 2008. The term of the agreement commenced as of December 1, 2008 and the current term would have expired on December 1, 2011, but has automatically renewed through December 1, 2014. The term of the agreement shall be automatically extended for successive 18 month periods, unless Optex Systems Holdings shall provide a written notice of termination at least ninety (90) days, or the Mr. Schoening shall provide a written notice of termination at least 90 days, prior to the end of the initial term or any extended term, as applicable. During the first eighteen months of the term of the agreement, Optex Systems Holdings paid to Schoening a base salary at the annual rate of $190,000, and his base salary for the first renewal term has continued at the same rate. On December 9, 2011, the Board of Directors of Optex Systems Holdings authorized a six percent increase in Schoening’s base salary effective January 1, 2012.  On December 19, 2013, the Board of Directors of Optex Systems Holdings authorized a five percent increase in Schoening’s base salary effective January 1, 2014. Schoening was paid a one-time bonus of $10,000 at the commencement of the employment agreement in December 2008 and was granted 1,414,649 options to purchase common stock of Optex Systems Holdings at an exercise price of $0.15 per share at the time of the closing of the reorganization.

 

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On each subsequent renewal date of the commencement of employment, Schoening’s base salary shall be reviewed by the Board and may be increased to such rate as the Board, in its sole discretion, may hereafter from time to time determine. During the term of the agreement, Schoening shall be entitled to receive bonuses of up to 30% of his base salary per year at the discretion of Optex Systems Holdings’ Board of Directors pursuant to performance objectives to be determined by the Board of Directors. Any bonuses shall be payable in cash and shall be paid within ninety (90) days of any year anniversary of the date of the agreement. Upon closing of the reorganization, Optex Systems Holdings granted Schoening stock options equal to 1% of the issued and outstanding shares of Optex Systems Holdings immediately after giving effect to the reorganization, with 34% of the options having vested on March 30, 2010, and 33% of the options having vested on March 31, 2011 and 33% of the options having vested on March 31, 2012.

 

The employment agreement events of termination consist of: (i) death of Mr. Schoening; (ii) termination by Optex Systems Holdings for cause (including conviction of a felony, commission of fraudulent acts, willful misconduct by Mr. Schoening, continued failure to perform duties after written notice, violation of securities laws and breach of the employment agreement), (iii) termination without cause by Optex Systems Holdings and (iv) termination by Mr. Schoening for good reason (including breach by Optex Systems Holdings of its obligations under the agreement, the requirement for Mr. Schoening to move more than 100 miles away for his employment without consent, and merger or consolidation that results in more than 66% of the combined voting power of the then outstanding securities of Optex Systems Holdings or its successor changing ownership or a sale of all or substantially all of Optex Systems Holdings’ assets, without the surviving entity assuming the obligations under the agreement). For a termination by Optex Systems Holdings for cause or upon death of Mr. Schoening, Mr. Schoening shall be paid salary and bonus earned through the date of termination. For a termination by Optex Systems Holdings without cause or by Mr. Schoening with good reason, Mr. Schoening shall also be paid six months base salary in effect and all granted stock options shall remain exercisable for a period of two years after such termination, with all unvested stock options immediately vesting. The agreement contains a standard non-solicitation and non-compete agreement that extends for one year subsequent to termination thereof.

 

·On December 19, 2013, pursuant to the compensation bonus agreement in the Board of Directors Resolution dated January 3, 2013, Danny Schoening, CEO, was awarded an executive compensation incentive bonus payout in the sum of $42 thousand.
·On December 19, 2013, the Board of Directors of Optex Systems Holdings, Inc. approved a performance based compensation bonus agreement for Danny Schoening, CEO, for the fiscal year ending September 28, 2014 with payout milestones from 5% to 25% for achieved revenues of $13 million through $20 million and EBITDA targets of $0 to $800 thousand.
·On December 19, 2013 the Board of Directors of Optex Systems Holdings, Inc. authorized salary increase of 5% to Danny Schoening, CEO, effective January 1, 2014.

 

Optex Systems Holdings does not have any other employment agreements with its executive officers and directors.

 

Equity Compensation Plan Information

 

Optex Systems Holdings currently has an option compensation plan covering the issuance of options for the purchase of up to 75,000,000 shares, which was increased from 50,000,000 shares on December 19, 2013 The purpose of the Plan is to assist Optex Systems Holdings in attracting and retaining highly competent employees and to act as an incentive in motivating selected officers and other employees of Optex Systems Holdings and its subsidiaries, and directors and consultants of Optex Systems Holdings and its subsidiaries, to achieve long-term corporate objectives. There are 75,000,000 shares of common stock reserved for issuance under this Plan. As of September 29, 2013, Optex Systems Holdings had issued 48,751,649 share options under this Plan of which 504,000 shares had forfeited and 17,700,149 shares had vested as of September 29, 2013.  . On December 19, 2013 , the Board of Directors of Optex Systems Holdings, authorized the grant of 20,000,000 options to three board members and a grant of 5,000,000 to an Optex Systems Holdings officer. The outstanding options include 10,182,500 options that are currently vested and exercisable as of December 9, 2013. The vested options represent potential future cash proceeds to our company of $631,297.There are no additional options that will become vested and exercisable within 60 days. The remaining options will vest and become exercisable over the next two to four years. The following table provides summary information on our outstanding options as of December 19, 2013.

 

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   Vested Option Grants   Unvested Option Grants 
   Shares   Price   Proceeds   Shares   Price   Proceeds 
FY2009 Employee & officer plan options   2,517,649   $0.15   $377,647       $0.15   $ 
FY2012 Employee & officer plan options (1)   10,365,000   $0.01   $103,650    10,365,000   $0.01   $103,650 
FY2012 Directors plan options (1)   15,000,000    0.01    150,000    10,000,000    0.01    100,000 
FY2014 Directors plan options (2)       0.01        20,000,000    0.01    200,000 
FY2014 Employee & officer plan options (2)       0.01        5,000,000    0.01    50,000 
Non-plan options to consultants and employees                        
Total   27,882,649   $0.02   $631,297    45,365,000   $0.01   $453,650 

 

(1)Includes 15,182,500 options that were vested and exercisable as of fiscal year ended September 29, 2013 and 10,182,500 options that became vested and exercisable as of December 9, 2013. The FY2012 directors plan options include 5,000,000 options for Ron Richards, former director, which became fully vested as of December 31, 2012 pursuant to a January 3, 2013 Board of Directors resolution and acceptance of his resignation.
(2)Options granted by the Board of Directors as of December 19, 2013

 

The holders of options are not required to exercise their rights at any time and we are unable to predict the amount and timing of any future option exercises. We reserve the right to temporarily reduce the exercise prices of our options from time to time in order to encourage the early exercise of the options.

 

Outstanding Equity Awards as of September 29, 2013

 

   Option Awards     
   Number of shares underlying unexercised options        
   Non-Plan   Equity Incentive Plan
Awards
        
Name  #
Exercisable
   #
Unexercisable
   Total
Granted
   Exercise
Price
   Expiration
Date
  Footnotes 
                        
Danny Schoening   1,414,649        1,414,649    0.15   3/29/2016   (1)
    2,500,000    7,500,000    10,000,000    0.01   12/8/2018   (3)
                             
Karen Hawkins   250,000        250,000    0.15   5/13/2016   (2)
    1,250,000    3,750,000    5,000,000    0.01   12/8/2018   (3)
                             
Stan Hirschman   1,250,000    3,750,000    5,000,000    0.01   12/8/2018   (3)

 

(1)Options granted on March 30, 2009 pursuant to employment agreement and reverse Merger. Shares vest over 3 years at a rate of 34%, 33% and 33% for each respective anniversary date subsequent to 2009 and expire after seven years. As of September 29, 2013 100% of the options had vested.

 

(2)Options granted on May 14, 2009 pursuant to employee stock option compensation plan. Shares vest over 4 years at a rate of 25% per year each respective anniversary date subsequent to 2009 and expire after seven years. As of September 29, 2013 100% of the options had vested.
(3)Options granted on December 9, 2011 pursuant to employee stock option compensation plan. Shares vest over 4 years at a rate of 25% per year each respective anniversary date subsequent to 2011 and expire after seven years. As of September 29, 2013 25% of the options had vested and an additional 25% of the total granted options had vested and became exercisable on December 9, 2013.

 

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Nonqualified deferred compensation

 

We had no non-qualified deferred compensation plans during year ended September 29, 2013.

 

Director Compensation

The following table provides information regarding compensation paid to directors for services rendered during the year ended September 29, 2013.

 

   Fees                         
   Earned or           Non-Equity   Nonqualified         
   Paid in   Stock   Option   Incentive Plan   Deferred   All Other     
   Cash   Awards   Awards   Compensation   Compensation   Compensation     
Name  ($)   ($)   ($)(3)   ($)   Earnings ($)   ($)   Total ($) 
Ronald F. Richards (1)  $22,500        28,273               $50,773 
Stanley A. Hirschman                             
Merrick Okamoto (2)   30,000        7,968                37,968 
Danny Schoening                             

 

(1)Director Fees paid monthly from October 2012 through December 2012. Mr. Richards was paid $2,500 monthly as an Independent Director, $2,500 monthly for serving as Chairman of the Audit Committee, and $2,500 monthly for serving as Chairman of the Board of Directors. He resigned effective December 31, 2012.

 

(2)Director Fees paid monthly from October 2012 through September 2013. Mr. Okamoto is paid $2,500 monthly as an Independent Director.

 

(3)The amounts in the “Option awards” column reflect the dollar amounts recognized as the director fee portion of compensation expense for financial statement reporting purposes for each named director executive officer during fiscal 2013, as required by FASB ASC 718, disregarding any estimates for forfeitures relating to service-based vesting conditions. For the assumptions relating to these valuations, see note 10 to our fiscal 2013 audited financial statements. Stanley A. Hirschman and Danny Schoening option awards have been separately reported as Executive Compensation on the summary compensation table.

 

The members of our board of directors are actively involved in various aspects of our business ranging from relatively narrow board oversight functions to providing hands-on guidance to our executives and scientific staff with respect to matters within their personal experience and expertise. We believe that the active involvement of all directors in our principal business and policy decisions increases our board of directors’ understanding of our needs and improves the overall quality of our management decisions.

 

With the exception of Mr. Hirschman and Danny Schoening, our directors are compensated separately for service as members of our board of directors. As of February 1, 2010, Mr. Hirschman was paid a salary from Optex Systems Holdings as disclosed in the executive compensation table above.

 

Nonqualified deferred compensation

 

We had no non-qualified deferred compensation plans during year ended September 29, 2013.

 

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Post-Termination Compensation

 

We have not entered into change in control agreements with any of our named executive officers or other members of the executive management team other than the provision with respect to Mr. Schoening described above. No awards of equity incentives under our 2009 Stock Option Plan provide for immediate vesting upon a change in control. However, our Board of Directors has the full and exclusive power to interpret the plans, including the power to accelerate the vesting of outstanding, unvested awards. A “change in control” is generally defined as (1) the acquisition by any person of 66% or more of the combined voting power of our outstanding securities or (2) the occurrence of a transaction requiring stockholder approval and involving the sale of all or substantially all of our assets or the merger of us with or into another corporation.

 

Item 12.  

 

SECURITY OWNERSHIP OF CERTAIN BENEFICIAL OWNERS AND MANAGEMENT

 

On December 19, 2013, we had 157,346,607 shares of common stock, and 1,016 shares of Series A preferred stock issued and outstanding. The following table sets forth certain information with respect to the beneficial ownership of our securities as of December 19, 2013, for (i) each of our directors and executive officers; (ii) all of our directors and executive officers as a group; and (iii) each person who we know beneficially owns more than 5% of our common stock.

 

Beneficial ownership data in the table has been calculated based on Commission rules that require us to identify all securities that are exercisable for or convertible into shares of our common stock within 60 days of December 19, 2013 and treat the underlying stock as outstanding for the purpose of computing the percentage of ownership of the holder.

 

Except as indicated by the footnotes following the table, and subject to applicable community property laws, each person identified in the table possesses sole voting and investment power with respect to all capital stock held by that person. The address of each named executive officer and director, unless indicated otherwise by footnote, is c/o Optex Systems Holdings’ corporate headquarters.

 

Except as otherwise set forth below, the address of each of the persons listed below is Optex Systems Holdings’ address.

 

Title of Class  Name of Beneficial Owner  Number of
Shares
  Preferred
Conversion
(4)
  Combined
Ownership
  Percentage of
Outstanding
Shares
 
                     
5% Holders  Alpha Capital (1)   12,500,000   61,789,505   74,289,505   8.46%
   Sileas Corporation (2)(3)   102,184,347   635,267,484   737,451,831   83.98%
                     
                     
Directors and
Officers:
  Stanley Hirschman (2)(9)   104,684,347   635,267,484   739,951,831   84.27%
   Danny Schoening (5)(7)   108,598,996   635,267,484   743,866,480   84.71%
   Karen Hawkins (8)   2,750,000   —     2,750,000   0.31%
   Merrick Okamoto (6)(9)   4,450,000   —     4,450,000   0.51%
                     
Directors and officers as a group (4 Individuals)      118,298,996   635,267,484   753,566,480   85.82%

 

1Represents shares held by Alpha Capital Anstalt, which is located at Pradafant 7, 9490 Furstentums, Vaduz, Lichtenstein
2Represents shares held by Sileas of which Stanley Hirschman, a Director/Officer Optex Systems Holdings, has a controlling interest (80%); therefore, under Rule 13d-3 of the Exchange Act, Mr. Hirschman is deemed to be the beneficial owner, along with Mr. Schoening.

 

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3Sileas’ ownership interest in Optex Systems Holdings has been pledged to Longview as security for a loan in connection with the acquisition of Longview’s interests in Optex Delaware by Sileas. Investment decisions for Longview are made by its investment advisor, Viking Asset Management, LLC. Mr. Peter Benz is the Chairman, Chief Executive Officer and a Managing Member of Viking Asset Management and may be deemed to control its business activities, including the investment activities of Longview. Mr. Merrick Okamoto who is a director of Optex Systems Holdings is the President and a Managing Member of Viking Asset Management and may be deemed to control its business activities, including the investment activities of Longview. In the event of a default by Sileas on its debt obligation to Longview, the shares held by Sileas may be returned to Longview. Viking and Longview each may be deemed to have shared voting and dispositive authority over the shares of Optex Systems Holdings’ common stock if they are returned to Longview. In such an event, Mr. Benz and Mr. Okamoto, as control persons of Viking and/or Longview, may be deemed to beneficially own all such shares; however, they have stated that they would disclaim such beneficial ownership were this to occur.
4Represents shares of common stock issuable upon conversion of preferred stock held by the stockholder. Sileas Corporation holds 926 of the preferred shares which are convertible into 635,267,484 common shares. Alpha Capital Anstalt owns the remaining 90 preferred shares convertible into  61,789,526 common shares.
5Represents 102,184,347 shares held by Sileas of which Mr. Schoening, an Officer of Optex Systems Holdings, has a controlling interest (15%); therefore, under Rule 13d-3 of the Exchange Act, Mr. Schoening is deemed to be the beneficial owner, along with Mr. Hirschman, of those shares.
6Includes1,950,000 shares of Common Stock held by Longview Fund, LP. Investment decisions for Longview are made by its investment advisor, Viking Asset Management, LLC. Mr. Merrick Okamoto who is a director of Optex Systems Holdings is the President and a Managing Member of Viking Asset Management and may be deemed to control its business activities, including the investment activities of Longview. Mr. Okamoto, as a control person of Viking and/or Longview, may be deemed to beneficially own all such shares; however, he disclaims such beneficial ownership.
7Includes options to purchase 6,414,649 shares of our common stock which have vested and are currently exercisable.
8Represents options to purchase 2,750,000 shares of our common stock which have vested and are currently exercisable.

9Includes options for Mr. Merrick Okamoto along with Mr. Hirschman to purchase 2,500,000 shares each of our common stock which have vested and are currently exercisable

 

Item 13  Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence

 

Relationship between Optex Systems, Inc. (Texas), Irvine Sensors Corporation and Longview and Alpha

 

Longview and Alpha were owed certain debt by Irvine Sensors Corporation including debt evidenced by (i) a December 29, 2006 Term Loan and Security Agreement executed by Irvine Sensors Corporation and Longview and Alpha, and (ii) a series of secured promissory notes purchased by them and issued to them on December 29, 2006, July 19, 2007 and November 28, 2007. As of August 24, 2008, the total amount due under all of the described notes was approximately $18.4 million. Optex Systems, Inc. (Texas), which was and is a wholly owned subsidiary of Irvine Sensors Corporation, was a guarantor of all of those notes, and pursuant to related security agreements Longview and Alpha had a validly perfected, fully enforceable security interest in all personal property of Optex Systems, Inc. (Texas). On September 19, 2008, pursuant to an Assignment and Stock/Note Issuance Agreement, Alpha and Longview transferred and assigned to Optex Systems, Inc. (Delaware) which assumed, $15 million of their respective interests and rights in the aforesaid notes and obligations to Optex Systems, Inc. (Delaware) in exchange for $9 million of equity and $6 million of debt.

 

Acquisition of Assets of Optex Systems, Inc. (Texas) by Optex Systems, Inc. (Delaware) on October 14, 2008

 

On October 14, 2008, in a purchase transaction that was cons