Quarterly report pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d)

5. BRAC's IPO, Consolidation of BRAC and Non-controlling Interest

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5. BRAC's IPO, Consolidation of BRAC and Non-controlling Interest
9 Months Ended
Sep. 30, 2018
Restructuring and Related Activities [Abstract]  
BRAC's IPO, Consolidation of BRAC and Non-controlling Interest

Note 5 – BRAC’s IPO, Consolidation of BRAC and Non-controlling Interest

 

BRAC’s IPO

 

The registration statement for BRAC’s IPO was declared effective on October 4, 2017. The registration statement was initially declared effective for 10,000,000 units (“Units” and, with respect to the common stock included in the Units being offered, the “Public Shares”), but the offering was increased to 12,000,000 Units pursuant to Rule 462(b) under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended. On October 10, 2017, the Company consummated the Initial Public Offering of 12,000,000 units, generating gross proceeds of $120,000,000.

 

Simultaneous with the closing of the Initial Public Offering, BRAC sold 400,000 units (the “Placement Units”) at a price of $10.00 per Unit in a private placement to BROG, generating gross proceeds of $4,000,000. BROG’s investment in BRAC’s common stock is eliminated in consolidation.

 

Transaction costs relating to the IPO amounted to $2,882,226, consisting of $2,400,000 of underwriting fees and $482,226 of other costs.

 

Following the closing of the IPO on October 10, 2017, an amount of $120,600,000 ($10.05 per Unit) from the net proceeds of the sale of the Units in the IPO and the Placement Units was placed in a trust account (“Trust Account”) and is invested in U.S. government securities, within the meaning set forth in Section 2(a)(16) of the Investment Company Act of 1940, as amended (the “Investment Company Act”), with a maturity of 180 days or less or in any open-ended investment company that holds itself out as a money market fund selected by the Company meeting the conditions of paragraphs (d)(2), (d)(3) and (d)(4) of Rule 2a-7 of the Investment Company Act, as determined by the Company, until the earlier of: (i) the consummation of a Business Combination or (ii) the distribution of the Trust Account, as described below.

 

On October 18, 2017, in connection with the underwriters’ exercise of their over-allotment option in full, BRAC sold an additional 1,800,000 Units and sold an additional 45,000 Placement Units to BROG at $10.00 per Unit, generating total proceeds of $18,450,000. Transaction costs for underwriting fees on the sale of the over-allotment units were $360,000. Following the closing, an additional $18,090,000 of the net proceeds ($10.05 per Unit) was placed in the Trust Account, bringing the total aggregate proceeds held in the Trust Account to $138,690,000 ($10.05 per Unit). BROG’s investment in BRAC’s common stock is eliminated in consolidation.

 

BRAC’s management has broad discretion with respect to the specific application of the net proceeds of the IPO and private placement, although substantially all of the net proceeds are intended to be applied generally toward consummating a Business Combination. There is no assurance that BRAC will be able to complete a Business Combination successfully. Upon the closing of the IPO, $10.05 per Unit sold in the IPO, including some of the proceeds of the Private Placements was deposited in a trust account (“Trust Account”) to be held until the earlier of (i) the consummation of its initial Business Combination or (ii) BRAC’s failure to consummate a Business Combination within 21 months from the consummation of the IPO (the “Combination Period”). Placing funds in the Trust Account may not protect those funds from third party claims against BRAC. Although BRAC will seek to have all vendors, service providers, prospective target businesses or other entities it engages, execute agreements with BRAC waiving any claim of any kind in or to any monies held in the Trust Account, there is no guarantee that such persons will execute such agreements. The Trust Account is maintained by a third party trustee. The remaining net proceeds (not held in the Trust Account) may be used to pay for business, legal and accounting due diligence on prospective acquisitions and continuing general and administrative expenses. Additionally, the interest earned on the Trust Account balance may be released to BRAC for any amounts that are necessary to pay BRAC’s income and other tax obligations and up to $50,000 that may be used to pay for the costs of liquidating BRAC. BROG has agreed that it will be liable to ensure that the proceeds in the Trust Account are not reduced below $10.05 per share by the claims of target businesses or claims of vendors or other entities that are owed money by BRAC for services rendered or contracted for or products sold to BRAC, but there is no assurance that BROG will be able to satisfy its indemnification obligations if it is required to do so. Additionally, the agreement entered into by BROG specifically provides for two exceptions to the indemnity it has given: it will have no liability (1) as to any claimed amounts owed to a target business or vendor or other entity who has executed an agreement with BRAC waiving any right, title, interest or claim of any kind they may have in or to any monies held in the Trust Account, or (2) as to any claims for indemnification by the underwriters of the IPO against certain liabilities, including liabilities under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended.

 

Initial Business Combination

 

Pursuant to the Nasdaq Capital Markets listing rules, BRAC’s initial Business Combination must be with a target business or businesses whose collective fair market value is at least equal to 80% of the balance in the Trust Account at the time of the execution of a definitive agreement for such Business Combination, although this may entail simultaneous acquisitions of several target businesses. The fair market value of the target will be determined by BRAC’s board of directors based upon one or more standards generally accepted by the financial community (such as actual and potential sales, earnings, cash flow and/or book value). The target business or businesses that BRAC acquires may have a collective fair market value substantially in excess of 80% of the Trust Account balance. In order to consummate such a Business Combination, BRAC may issue a significant amount of its debt or equity securities to the sellers of such business and/or seek to raise additional funds through a private offering of debt or equity securities. If BRAC’s securities are not listed on NASDAQ after the IPO, BRAC would not be required to satisfy the 80% requirement. However, BRAC intends to satisfy the 80% requirement even if BRAC’s securities are not listed on NASDAQ at the time of the initial Business Combination.

 

BRAC will provide the public stockholders, who are the holders of the common stock which was sold as part of the Units in the IPO, whether they are purchased in the IPO or in the aftermarket, or “Public Shares”, including BROG to the extent that it purchases such Public Shares (“Public Stockholders”), with an opportunity to redeem all or a portion of their Public Shares of BRAC’s Common stock, irrespective of whether they vote for or against the proposed transaction or if BRAC conducts a tender offer, upon the completion of the initial Business Combination either (1) in connection with a stockholder meeting called to approve the Business Combination, or (ii) by means of a tender offer, at a per-share price, payable in cash, equal to the aggregate amount then on deposit in the Trust Account including interest (net of franchise and income taxes payable, divided by the number of then outstanding Public Shares. The amount in the Trust Account, net of franchise and income taxes payable, currently amounts to $10.09 per Public Share. BRAC will proceed with a Business Combination only if BRAC has net tangible assets of at least $5,000,001 upon such consummation of a Business Combination and in the case of a stockholder vote, a majority of the outstanding shares voted are voted in favor of the Business Combination. The decision as to whether BRAC will seek stockholder approval of a proposed Business Combination or conduct a tender offer will be made by BRAC, solely in its discretion, based on a variety of factors such as the timing of the transaction and whether the terms of the transaction would otherwise require it to seek stockholder approval under the law or stock exchange listing requirement. If a stockholder vote is not required and BRAC decides not to hold a stockholder vote for business or other legal reasons, BRAC will, pursuant to the proposed amended and restated certificate of incorporation, (i) conduct the redemptions pursuant to Rule 13e-4 and Regulation 14E of the Exchange Act, which regulate issuer tender offers, and (ii) file tender offer documents with the SEC prior to completing the initial Business Combination which contain substantially the same financial and other information about the initial Business Combination and the redemption rights as is required under Regulation 14A of the Exchange Act, which regulates the solicitation of proxies.

 

BROG has agreed to vote its Founder Shares and any Public Shares purchased during or after the IPO in favor of the initial Business Combination, and BRAC’s executive officers and directors have also agreed to vote any Public Shares purchased during or after the IPO in favor of the Initial Business Combination. BROG entered into a letter agreement, pursuant to which it agreed to waive its redemption rights with respect to the Founder Shares, shares included in the Placement Units and Public Shares in connection with the completion of the initial Business Combination. In addition, BROG has agreed to waive its rights to liquidating distributions from the Trust Account with respect to the Founder Shares and shares included in the Placement Units if BRAC fails to complete the initial Business Combination within the prescribed time frame. However, if BROG (or any of BRAC’s executive officers, directors or affiliates) acquires Public Shares in or after the IPO, it will be entitled to liquidating distributions from the Trust Account with respect to such Public Shares in the event BRAC does not complete the initial Business Combination within such applicable time period.

 

Failure to Consummate a Business Combination

 

If BRAC is unable to complete the initial Business Combination within the Combination Period, BRAC must: (i) cease all operations except for the purpose of winding up, (ii) as promptly as reasonably possible but not more than ten business days thereafter, redeem the public shares, at a per-share price, payable in cash, equal to the aggregate amount then on deposit in the Trust Account, including interest (which interest shall be net of franchise fees and income taxes payable divided by the number of then outstanding Public Shares, which redemption will completely extinguish Public Stockholders’ rights as stockholders (including the right to receive further liquidation distributions, if any), subject to applicable law, and (iii) as promptly as reasonably possible following such redemption, subject to the approval of BRAC’s remaining stockholders and BRAC’s Board of Directors, dissolve and liquidate, subject in the case of clauses (ii) and (iii) to BRAC’s obligations under Delaware law to provide for claims of creditors and the requirements of other applicable law.

 

Consolidation of BRAC and Non-controlling Interest

 

The Company has determined that BRAC, following its IPO, is a variable interest entity (“VIE”) and that the Company is the primary beneficiary of the VIE. The Company determined that, due to the redemption feature associated with the IPO shares, that the IPO shareholders are indirectly protected from the operating expenses of BRAC and BROG has the power to direct the activities of BRAC through the date at which BRAC affords the stockholders the opportunity to vote to approve a proposed business combination. Therefore, these consolidated financial statements contain the operations of the BRAC from its inception on May 9, 2017. BRAC’s IPO shareholders are reflected in our Consolidated Financial Statements as a redeemable non-controlling interest. The non-controlling interest was recorded at fair value on October 10, 2017, with an addition on October 18, 2017 as a result of the underwriters’ exercise of their over-allotment option. The net earnings attributable to the IPO shareholders are subtracted from the net gain (loss) for any period to arrive at the net loss attributable to the Company and the non-controlling interest on the balance sheet is adjusted to include the net earnings attributable to the IPO shareholders.

 

Intercompany transactions and eliminations

 

BROG is paid a management fee by BRAC of $10,000 per month as part of an administrative services agreement, which commenced October 5, 2017, for general and administrative services including the cost of office space and personnel dedicated to BRAC. BROG is reimbursed for any out-of-pocket expenses, particularly travel, incurred in connection with activities on BRAC’s behalf, including but not limited to identifying potential target businesses and performing due diligence on suitable business combinations. There is no cap or ceiling on the reimbursement of out-of-pocket expenses incurred by BRAC. BRAC paid a total of $90,000 to BROG for such services for the nine months ended September 30, 2018. The management services income of BROG and the management services expense of BRAC as well as any balances due between the companies for such services or reimbursements were eliminated in consolidation.

 

BROG’s investment in BRAC and the resulting equity recorded by BRAC have been eliminated upon consolidation. Additionally, as a result of recognizing the fair value of the redeemable shares held by the BRAC IPO shareholders as a non-controlling interest as per FASB ASC 810-10-45-23, BROG has recognized an adjustment of $3,932,126 to additional paid-in capital. The non-controlling interest in BRAC held by the BRAC’s IPO shareholders is presented on the balance sheet as temporary equity.